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  • My girls were so excited to watch the new Sofia CHRISTMAS show but instead I'm trying to answer question about what the heck Wassailia is! There's a CHRISTMAS tree and CHRISTMAS presents and even the classic CHRISTMAS decoration colors so why can't you call it Christmas? I understand that not everyone celebrates Christmas but NOBODY celebrates Wassailia. At least the TV is off now since they lost interest.

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    • The same reason that JatNLP calls it "Winter Treasure Day". In the time period Sofia takes place, Christmas wasn't celebrated in the same way it is today and it would be a really big inaccuracy to have them celebrate it as such (kinda like how Halloween is "All Hallows Eve" and focuses on wearing costumes, no candy...). They combined modern Christmas elements with the traits of the old European tradition of Wassailing (singing carols and such) to create a holiday to celebrate the winter season and family togetherness.

      Hope that answers your question? I'm sorry your kids lost interest, it was actually a pretty good episode.

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    • So everyone on the show speaks nearly perfect American English, there are talking animals, magic, dragons, flying horses, fairies, etc., but they are suddenly interested in creating an authentically consistent historical setting by creating a make-believe holiday?  Perhaps they are just trying to maintain a consistent life of make-believe.

      However, given all the anti-Christmas messages in pop culture these days, and given the beliefs of individuals in the demographic most interested in magic and make-believe, it's hard to imagine that this isn’t Disney's attempt to walk the thin line of political correctness.

      With that said, this does provide a good opportunity to discuss the true meaning of Christmas and the desire of some to treat it as a mythological celebration.  So any chance to discuss the life of Christ is fine by our family.



      Thanks.

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    • I think the writers might've wanted to mix some elements of Hanukkah with Christmas, like the Wassalia tree (Christmas) and the candle (Hanukkah).

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    • The writers of the show are big on making sure everyone feels welcome, so if they made it Christmas, they'd leave out people who don't celebrate it. It's a dilemma similar to their Latina problem with Sofia, but it was necessary in this case to avoid potential offense.

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    • Royalreceiver wrote:
      The writers of the show are big on making sure everyone feels welcome, so if they made it Christmas, they'd leave out people who don't celebrate it. It's a dilemma similar to their Latina problem with Sofia, but it was necessary in this case to avoid potential offense.

      And Craig Gerber, the head writer, is Jewish.

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    • Royalreceiver wrote:
      Royalreceiver wrote:
      The writers of the show are big on making sure everyone feels welcome, so if they made it Christmas, they'd leave out people who don't celebrate it. It's a dilemma similar to their Latina problem with Sofia, but it was necessary in this case to avoid potential offense.
      And Craig Gerber, the head writer, is Jewish.
      Sofia the First - Sofia's First Christmas

      Craig is jewish, but he or Disney have no problem with the Christmas. Sofia the First takes place on time similar to our XVIII century, or XIX century beginning, if takes place during the same time as Frozen franchise (Sofia will meet Elsa and/or Anna in the future). During our old centuries, before Christmas holiday, some North Europe countries had this same Wassalia holiday what appears on Sofia the First. Sofia's kingdom is similar to United Kindgom on old times. But there's a book about Sofia joining Christmas when visited Princess Vivian on Zumaria.

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    • Royalreceiver wrote: The writers of the show are big on making sure everyone feels welcome, so if they made it Christmas, they'd leave out people who don't celebrate it. It's a dilemma similar to their Latina problem with Sofia, but it was necessary in this case to avoid potential offense.

      That's a lame excuse. You don't have to leave anyone out make an episode for people that celebrate something else.

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    • Apparently since your children lost interest there are some families that are still interested in well, children shows, especially single, lonely adults, such as myself. Yes, I'm an adult who watches the sofia the first, go ahead and laugh and make, fun.


      You done, alright, apparently it is a possibility that it happens in the 18th century or the 19th century, but........... not "our" 18th nor 19th century meaning..... I believe that this cartoon world Earth is predicting the future of the earth, which would explain human mermaids, because we don't have mermaids like in the cartoon, though we do have chimpanzee like mermaids(half-chimp, half-fish) but the half-human/half-fish type of mermaids, true there are defects that might make a person look like a mermaid, but they aren't "true" mermaids. I call true mermaids, stuff like in the cartoons, just so you know. And In one of the new Episode or the premiere episode or the Episode/Movie of Elena and The Secret of Avalor(the first cross-over show of Sofia the First and Elena of Avalor), there is a room that depicts tons of maps and if you paid close attention, the "used to be" continent of North America was mainly their north pole(except for a few land masses with a similar shape to that of the southern east coast. And South America itself was in their northern hemisphere but as an island. not as connection to Central America or anything of that sort, I believe that Central America was combined with the new kingdom of Avalor, because if you paid attention to the Maruvian temple shown in their it had the same type of temples as the Aztecs did. Not one hair difference besides the magic of course and what not. So this cartoon world predicts the future of humankind, 100,000 or more into the future with a repeating stuff. Because where did Flying Horses come from? Where did the half-human/half-fish mermaids or merpeople come from? Explain those logically, true it is a scandavian version of the old christmas, but remember the commercial-lized item, would be gone, if we were gone.

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    • Royalreceiver wrote:
      The writers of the show are big on making sure everyone feels welcome, so if they made it Christmas, they'd leave out people who don't celebrate it. It's a dilemma similar to their Latina problem with Sofia, but it was necessary in this case to avoid potential offense.

      That's what I thought! That because people are different ethnicities (I wonder if I'm spelling it right), they made a fake holiday so all people are involved without singling out anyone.

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    • I just discovered this show episode when looking for media for my son that is inclusive of our religion.  As a pagan family who celebrates Yule (Winter Solstice), finding inclusive media is difficult.  We decorate a fir tree to remind us of light and life in the darkest (and most dead) time of the year. We burn a Yule log. We exchange gifts and spend time with family. We sing songs.  For us, these decorations and events are all about Yule (We have a Yule tree, we sing Yule carols, we decorate our home for Yule, open gifts on Yule).  So, while I understand the Original Poster's desire to connect the holiday in the show to his or her family's religion, I think it's important to remember and realize that others connect to it differently (and that Wassalia could just as easily be a stand in for Pagan Yule as it is for Christian Christmas). I appreciate that Disney made this episode generic enough that each child can connect and relate to it as the holiday they celebrate (Original Poster's kids can relate to it as Christmas, and my kid can relate to it as Yule).

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    • People have nothing to do but complain. Its 2019. People are DIFFERENT. Its not a bad thing. Disney did a great job because at the end of the day, calling it Wassailia teaches tolerance of different customs, traditions and cultures, and teaches that although there are differences, there are also many similarities. That in itself is an important lesson. I support teaching your kids your own beliefs, but it would probably help in the future if children could learn to respect and learn from other beliefs as well. All this distain for something new or different in cartoonland just supports our current state of politics. Its pretty pathetic honestly. But I guess all the hatred and feelings of "my way is the right way" makes any average bully feel strong.

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    • A FANDOM user
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