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  • You wanna know what Anna, Elsa and Merida have in common? They are not ordinary princess they, are unique among the Disney Princess franchise.

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    • Every Disney Princess is unique.

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    • Disney4Disney wrote:
      Every Disney Princess is unique.

      No they arent.

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    • If you think they're different I think you also should include Tiana, she was career focusedhwo many disney ladies can say that?

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    • Let's be honest guys, great as they are, Snow White, Aurora and Cinderella are practically the same character

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    • Ok fine, Snow White and Cinderella aren't really different, but the rest of the Disney Princesses are unique, ok?

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    • Disney4Disney wrote:
      Ok fine, Snow White and Cinderella aren't really different, but the rest of the Disney Princesses are unique, ok?

      I won't deny that, I have nothing against the princesses, don't get me wrong

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    • Locati wrote:
      Let's be honest guys, great as they are, Snow White, Aurora and Cinderella are practically the same character

      leave the practically, they are the same

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    • Lets face it with the other disney princess it's the same thing, they are mostly just a pretty face looking for a handsom guy to come sweep them off their feet, they basicly just wait around for their prince charming to come and take care of them ect. But that is not the case with the last 3 princess (espacily Merida).

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    • Belle and Tiana are less like that then Anna

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    • What about Mulan and Pocahontas they're not that into charming men

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    • I think Snow white, Cinderella, Aurora, Jasmine, Ariel, Anna and Rapunzel are the ones who look for their princes. But I don't actually notice this with Rapunzel

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    • Orlando678 wrote:
      I think Snow white, Cinderella, Aurora, Jasmine, Ariel, Anna and Rapunzel are the ones who look for their princes. But I don't actually notice this with Rapunzel

      Well, Rapunzel's goal never was to be with her true love, she just found it along the way 

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    • Yes that's why I said I didn't notice this. Jasmine also wasn't looking for a man but more for freedom. She didn't want to marry someone she didn't love

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    • Actually, no they aren't. They are different people like different Disney Princesses.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Lets face it with the other disney princess it's the same thing, they are mostly just a pretty face looking for a handsom guy to come sweep them off their feet, they basicly just wait around for their prince charming to come and take care of them ect. But that is not the case with the last 3 princess (espacily Merida).

      ENOUGH WITH SAYING THE MERIDA, ANNA AND ELSA ONES ARE THE ONLY "UNIQUE" ONES! sorry, maybe that's too harsh, but please, this is really aggravating me how everyone is saying only Merida, Anna and Elsa are unique, They aren't the only ones! Think about Tiana, Rapunzel, Jasmine, Belle and Mulan. THEY'RE UNIQUE TOO IF YOU THINK STOP ABOUT IT!

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    • In my opinion, Mulan and Pocahontas are the most different of all. Pocahontas DID NOT want love. She wanted to find her path. Her story was rich, detailed and very great, because it was different. Mulan wanted to save her father, and uphold the family honor. Again, a very interesting and unique storyline. BTW @Disney4Disney, you forgot Pocahontas! ;)

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    • Myruthb wrote:
      In my opinion, Mulan and Pocahontas are the most different of all. Pocahontas DID NOT want love. She wanted to find her path. Her story was rich, detailed and very great, because it was different. Mulan wanted to save her father, and uphold the family honor. Again, a very interesting and unique storyline. BTW @Disney4Disney, you forgot Pocahontas! ;)

      Oh yeah! How could I have forgotten such a cool Disney Princess? Especially since she sings one of my favorite Disney songs, Colors of the Wind. She's definately one of the unique ones too!

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    • So do all of us agree that Elsa, Anna, and Merida aren't the only unique Disney princesses?

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      So do all of us agree that Elsa, Anna, and Merida aren't the only unique Disney princesses?

      Agreed

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    • Locati wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      So do all of us agree that Elsa, Anna, and Merida aren't the only unique Disney princesses?

      Agreed

      Good.

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    • Agreed

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    • Should this be closed then?

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    • Agreed

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      Should this be closed then?

      Probably.

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    • I will try to close it.

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      I will try to close it.

      You don't have to close it someone may have something they want to say in this discussion.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      I will try to close it.

      You don't have to close it someone may have something they want to say in this discussion.

      Okay.

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      I will try to close it.
      You don't have to close it someone may have something they want to say in this discussion.
      Okay.

      Thank you.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:
      I will try to close it.
      You don't have to close it someone may have something they want to say in this discussion.
      Okay.

      Thank you.

      Anyone wants I say something?

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    • Myruthb wrote:
      In my opinion, Mulan and Pocahontas are the most different of all. Pocahontas DID NOT want love. She wanted to find her path. Her story was rich, detailed and very great, because it was different. Mulan wanted to save her father, and uphold the family honor. Again, a very interesting and unique storyline. BTW @Disney4Disney, you forgot Pocahontas! ;)

      What Did't Pocahontas play the damsil in distrass in the sequle after being locked up in the tower.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Myruthb wrote:
      In my opinion, Mulan and Pocahontas are the most different of all. Pocahontas DID NOT want love. She wanted to find her path. Her story was rich, detailed and very great, because it was different. Mulan wanted to save her father, and uphold the family honor. Again, a very interesting and unique storyline. BTW @Disney4Disney, you forgot Pocahontas! ;)
      What Did't Pocahontas play the damsil in distrass in the sequle after being locked up in the tower.

      That sequel never happened, don't try to tell me the opposite, it doesn't exist, it's a mistake, it's a differente reality, don't care

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    • Locati wrote:
      Wolf 91 wrote:
      Myruthb wrote:
      In my opinion, Mulan and Pocahontas are the most different of all. Pocahontas DID NOT want love. She wanted to find her path. Her story was rich, detailed and very great, because it was different. Mulan wanted to save her father, and uphold the family honor. Again, a very interesting and unique storyline. BTW @Disney4Disney, you forgot Pocahontas! ;)
      What Did't Pocahontas play the damsil in distrass in the sequle after being locked up in the tower.
      That sequel never happened, don't try to tell me the opposite, it doesn't exist, it's a mistake, it's a differente reality, don't care

      Wait your saying Pocahontas 2 never happend cause it did.

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    • i think ariel is preaty unique she wasent looking for love she wated to see the human world and she wanted adventure its just that she fell in love with a guy that represented everithing that the human world could bring her this is why in the trivia section she is put in the rebelius section when it comes to how they are devided just cause she plaid damsel at one pointy  dosent mean she aint unique i mean she had eough courage to push ursula when ursula tranformed her father and even tho the clasic princesses bearly show spunkyness dosent mean they arent unique they all had diferent roles in there fils showing u that things can change no mater ur sircumstancess.

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    • pocahhontas in her second movie was a damsel but just because she was a damsell dosent mean she aint a strong women cause even merida was almost eaten by mordu and the person who saved her was her mom she didnt defited him making her have a damsel in distress moment 

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    • Koji1616 wrote: i think ariel is preaty unique she wasent looking for love she wated to see the human world and she wanted adventure its just that she fell in love with a guy that represented everithing that the human world could bring her this is why in the trivia section she is put in the rebelius section when it comes to how they are devided just cause she plaid damsel at one pointy  dosent mean she aint unique i mean she had eough courage to push ursula when ursula tranformed her father and even tho the clasic princesses bearly show spunkyness dosent mean they arent unique they all had diferent roles in there fils showing u that things can change no mater ur sircumstancess.

      Actually, the whole "seeing the human world" was side stuff for "tru wuv". Ariel was the ultimate damsel in my opinion, she relied on a guy to make her happy. She risked her life for a guy she hadn't even talked to. He didn't know her name! But of course, it worked out in the end so she's "spunky".

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    • Actually love is the side part of this she wanted to see the human world way before she saw eric for the first time and even if she risqued becoming a human love is what impulsed her to fo it. she made her own desitions and of the hole damsel in distres she is a stong women aside from getting saved she even shows it in the second movie she didnt think twice of going in the ocean to save her daugter and showing that somtimes u need help from another being represented as a prince it isent bad to get saved and even if u can be strong u also need help thats why she is unique

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    • Koji1616 wrote: Actually love is the side part of this she wanted to see the human world way before she saw eric for the first time and even if she risqued becoming a human love is what impulsed her to fo it. she made her own desitions and of the hole damsel in distres she is a stong women aside from getting saved she even shows it in the second movie she didnt think twice of going in the ocean to save her daugter and showing that somtimes u need help from another being represented as a prince it isent bad to get saved and even if u can be strong u also need help thats why she is unique

      Ell, I actually think your wrong. She wouldn't have gone on land if the man wasn't there. If you will contradict, then why didn't she go before she met Eric? And I wouldn't say strong, she didn't seem to actually have a reason for risking her life (most strong people think before frolicking into dangerous situations). Imagine if he was already married? What if he didn't like her (don't pull the "BUT THEIR PURFECT FOR EACHOTHER" gig, she would probably get really disappointed when she finds out that he picks his nose and eats it. Yes, I remember Kristoff. He says that all boys do it)

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    • she is stong if what ur saying about stong people was true non of them are stong cause most of them disnt think what would hapen for example merida with the tart she gave her mom she didnt think before doing that so those that make her week acording to you ? being a stong person is risking things for the well of others even if u risk ursels in situations like i said before every princesss is unique  and ariel i belive is unique because she is stong whiled a good person her curiosoty drives her to want to be human and like i said eric represents what the human world was to her even the disney animators mention that in the making off. and she didnt turn human before she meet him because she was scared her father didnt want her to leave and what inpulsed her to change was because her father didnt want to let her even meet him or talk to him when her dad destroys her collection thats when she sees her dad wont cchange and has taking it too far so she took a risk and most people take a risk to falow there dreams thats why shes unique.

      side note the hole problem for me of judging the princesses is that most people judge them for what they see in the movie not the reasons why they did it or there circumstancess  this is for all the people who down grade a princess in general. i mean they are all unique thats the reason they are all succesesfull ass a group 

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    • and u dont have to have an aditude thought this im just giving my point of view on my favorite princess its not to get anyone mad or for them to act rude

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    • Koji1616 wrote: and u dont have to have an aditude thought this im just giving my point of view on my favorite princess its not to get anyone mad or for them to act rude

      Well, sorry if I had an attitude. I just feel like Ariel gets a little too much credit.

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    • just like most princesses tho they are fitional characters and people get mad over a character 

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    • Koji1616 wrote:
      just like most princesses tho they are fitional characters and people get mad over a character 

      Yeah, I can understand people getting mad over a character, but I don't think it matters if it's fictional or not, I mean, the whole point of animation is making drawings come to life, I think it's pretty darn magical that we actually forget they are not alive, don't you?

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    • it is magical but to get to the point that they degrade the character just because they arent "unique" or diferent is just ubsern i find it degrading the likes of others that why i find that doing the who is more unique and stuff is wrong cause they are all unique 

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    • Orlando678 wrote:
      What about Mulan and Pocahontas they're not that into charming men

      Pocahontas was into charming men everything she did was to be with Jhon Smith and she did not loss intrast in Jhon Smith until she met Jhon Rolfe.

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    • Orlando678 wrote:
      I think Snow white, Cinderella, Aurora, Jasmine, Ariel, Anna and Rapunzel are the ones who look for their princes. But I don't actually notice this with Rapunzel

      Anna did like the idea of being married but only because she wanted to fill the void left by Elsa and everything she did was to help or reconact with her sister. And by the way you forgot Pocahontas and Mulan.

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    • Mulan wasn't interested in men, she wanted to protect her honor and to save her father. Pocahontas did at some point only gave interest about John Smith but also about her own tribe.

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    • Just out of curiosity if Mulan and Pocahontas were as unique as Merida, Anna and Elsa then why are Merida, Elsa and Anna so popular among the franchise while I read somewhare that Pocahontas and Mulan were the least popular? 

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Koji1616 wrote: Actually love is the side part of this she wanted to see the human world way before she saw eric for the first time and even if she risqued becoming a human love is what impulsed her to fo it. she made her own desitions and of the hole damsel in distres she is a stong women aside from getting saved she even shows it in the second movie she didnt think twice of going in the ocean to save her daugter and showing that somtimes u need help from another being represented as a prince it isent bad to get saved and even if u can be strong u also need help thats why she is unique

      Ell, I actually think your wrong. She wouldn't have gone on land if the man wasn't there. If you will contradict, then why didn't she go before she met Eric? And I wouldn't say strong, she didn't seem to actually have a reason for risking her life (most strong people think before frolicking into dangerous situations). Imagine if he was already married? What if he didn't like her (don't pull the "BUT THEIR PURFECT FOR EACHOTHER" gig, she would probably get really disappointed when she finds out that he picks his nose and eats it. Yes, I remember Kristoff. He says that all boys do it)

      Maybe you've forgotten, but Ariel already built up a huge collection (two, if we go by the TV series), and explicitly stated that she wanted to be among humanity as her ultimate dream, and keep in mind that this was BEFORE she even witnessed, much less met Eric. That speaks VOLUMES about Ariel's desire to be among humanity and how strong it was. All Eric did was act as the final push, really. Heck, the writers made it clear that they gave her a fascination with humanity that was powerful enough to not only create at least one impressive collection, but even desire to become human, specifically so they could avert the concept of her only desiring to become human because of Eric. And as far as her not going up before meeting Eric, let's be realistic, the only person besides Ursula who might have the ability to transform Ariel into a human, her father King Triton, won't do so because he hated humans by that point. Even if she wanted to, she most likely has no option, and she definitely would not have gone to Ursula, and pretty much only did so because Flotsam and Jetsam preyed on her then-current distraught emotions (and besides which, she didn't even know that Ursula could do such a thing anyways, so she had no reason to go for her even if she didn't have any qualms). Not to mention it's implied that merpeople cannot actually become humans without magical aid, so even with Ariel's frequent disobedience regarding surfacing, she really can't do much about it.

      And on topic, Ariel may have had Eric as a motive by the halfway point, but Ariel did indeed have something besides Eric that drove her to become human anyways, as established firmly in Part of Your World, heck, even her treasure hunting at that sunken ship, so actually, she's pretty much one of the reasons we even have a Merida, Elsa, and Anna, so, no, they weren't unique. Actually, come to think of it, the only princesses actually concerned with getting a prince as the entirety of their goal were Aurora and possibly Cinderella. Snow White was more concerned about hiding from her murderous stepmother than marrying a prince (and for good reason, really, considering her stepmother tried to have a huntsman try to assassinate her, a huntsman whom turned out to have a conscience and warned her at the last minute to flee. Heck, we could even assume that the Prince and Snow White already knew each other from before the events of the film considering her visited the castle in what was implied to be a recurring instance.), Ariel already had wanted to be with humanity anyways even before she met Eric (and at least Ariel actually managed to stay and secretly observe Eric long enough to get a pretty good idea about his character. Aurora and Cinderella simply fell for their Prince Charming without even doing much observation and just had luck that they turned out to be good guys), Belle basically wanted to escape into literature and go on adventures, Jasmine basically wanted to evade a law of marriage that her father despite being the position of Sultan, couldn't even revoke until late into the film, Pocahontas not only didn't want to marry, but she didn't even marry at all in the first film, Mulan was more concerned about not getting her father killed due to his obviously being dangerously unqualified for soldiering due to an injury he sustained than marrying (not to mention already failed a matchmaking test due to Granny's cricket escaping and causing havoc), Tiana was initially more concerned with getting a job than marrying, Rapunzel moreorless wanted to see floating lights, and that's not even mentioning Merida, Elsa, or Anna (and even Anna is basically an example of what happens if Cinderella or Aurora had the rotten luck of falling in love with a prince who was not so charming to say the very least). So yeah, stop making them out to be unique, because they're not unique in the slightest.

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    • thank u so much i thought i was the only on that thought they were al unique in there own whay making them equal 

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:


      Koji1616 wrote: Actually love is the side part of this she wanted to see the human world way before she saw eric for the first time and even if she risqued becoming a human love is what impulsed her to fo it. she made her own desitions and of the hole damsel in distres she is a stong women aside from getting saved she even shows it in the second movie she didnt think twice of going in the ocean to save her daugter and showing that somtimes u need help from another being represented as a prince it isent bad to get saved and even if u can be strong u also need help thats why she is unique

      Ell, I actually think your wrong. She wouldn't have gone on land if the man wasn't there. If you will contradict, then why didn't she go before she met Eric? And I wouldn't say strong, she didn't seem to actually have a reason for risking her life (most strong people think before frolicking into dangerous situations). Imagine if he was already married? What if he didn't like her (don't pull the "BUT THEIR PURFECT FOR EACHOTHER" gig, she would probably get really disappointed when she finds out that he picks his nose and eats it. Yes, I remember Kristoff. He says that all boys do it)
      Maybe you've forgotten, but Ariel already built up a huge collection (two, if we go by the TV series), and explicitly stated that she wanted to be among humanity as her ultimate dream, and keep in mind that this was BEFORE she even witnessed, much less met Eric. That speaks VOLUMES about Ariel's desire to be among humanity and how strong it was. All Eric did was act as the final push, really. Heck, the writers made it clear that they gave her a fascination with humanity that was powerful enough to not only create at least one impressive collection, but even desire to become human, specifically so they could avert the concept of her only desiring to become human because of Eric. And as far as her not going up before meeting Eric, let's be realistic, the only person besides Ursula who might have the ability to transform Ariel into a human, her father King Triton, won't do so because he hated humans by that point. Even if she wanted to, she most likely has no option, and she definitely would not have gone to Ursula, and pretty much only did so because Flotsam and Jetsam preyed on her then-current distraught emotions (and besides which, she didn't even know that Ursula could do such a thing anyways, so she had no reason to go for her even if she didn't have any qualms). Not to mention it's implied that merpeople cannot actually become humans without magical aid, so even with Ariel's frequent disobedience regarding surfacing, she really can't do much about it.

      And on topic, Ariel may have had Eric as a motive by the halfway point, but Ariel did indeed have something besides Eric that drove her to become human anyways, as established firmly in Part of Your World, heck, even her treasure hunting at that sunken ship, so actually, she's pretty much one of the reasons we even have a Merida, Elsa, and Anna, so, no, they weren't unique. Actually, come to think of it, the only princesses actually concerned with getting a prince as the entirety of their goal were Aurora and possibly Cinderella. Snow White was more concerned about hiding from her murderous stepmother than marrying a prince (and for good reason, really, considering her stepmother tried to have a huntsman try to assassinate her, a huntsman whom turned out to have a conscience and warned her at the last minute to flee. Heck, we could even assume that the Prince and Snow White already knew each other from before the events of the film considering her visited the castle in what was implied to be a recurring instance.), Ariel already had wanted to be with humanity anyways even before she met Eric (and at least Ariel actually managed to stay and secretly observe Eric long enough to get a pretty good idea about his character. Aurora and Cinderella simply fell for their Prince Charming without even doing much observation and just had luck that they turned out to be good guys), Belle basically wanted to escape into literature and go on adventures, Jasmine basically wanted to evade a law of marriage that her father despite being the position of Sultan, couldn't even revoke until late into the film, Pocahontas not only didn't want to marry, but she didn't even marry at all in the first film, Mulan was more concerned about not getting her father killed due to his obviously being dangerously unqualified for soldiering due to an injury he sustained than marrying (not to mention already failed a matchmaking test due to Granny's cricket escaping and causing havoc), Tiana was initially more concerned with getting a job than marrying, Rapunzel moreorless wanted to see floating lights, and that's not even mentioning Merida, Elsa, or Anna (and even Anna is basically an example of what happens if Cinderella or Aurora had the rotten luck of falling in love with a prince who was not so charming to say the very least). So yeah, stop making them out to be unique, because they're not unique in the slightest.

      Are you sure cause many months ago (Novamber 21 to be exact)  I posted a comment on the Disney Princess camment section about seeing a news story about parents not wanting their kids to wait around for their princes and live a life of fairy tails and User: Sings-With-Spirits User:Sings-With-Spirits was one of the users who replyed and he said and I quote.


      I think they are right; the ideal that a girl is incapable of standing up for herself and needs a prince to come rescue her and make her life worthwhile is appalling; this is classically seen in many of the earlier Princess films, though it can be said that as time progressed, the roles definitely changed in the films... but the franchise still babyfied them.

      To wit:

      Snow White, Cinderella and Aurora are, basically, pretty damsels in distress, rescued by their prince. (There are deeper nuances, but we are talking popular perception of the base story).

      Ariel chooses to be a pretty girl with no voice in "man's world" until her prince saves her.

      Belle is seen as a pretty face and not much more in her town; she has a bleak future until SHE rescues the prince (Yaay!) and then HE takes her away from having to live with the uneducated, petty, peasants (back to formula).

      Jasmine lives a boring, sheltered life until her "prince" rescues her from the drudgery by showing her "a whole new world".

      Pocahontas is a major exception... sort of... she ends the film longing for the return of John Smith...

      Mulan totally breaks the mold in her film... but her doll has her in a pretty dress, waiting for her prince to come (I'm not making this up; it is in the back of her doll); the fact that the doll has high-heel-only barbie feet (at least the earlier ones) totally misses the point about the character.

      Tiana had a wonderful dream; a dream that was going to be extremely unlikely... until she rescues the prince (yaay!) and HE makes her dream of opening a high-class restaurant come true. If not for him, her dream would never come true.

      Rapunzel... what would have happened if Eugene had not shown up at her tower? It was his utter and complete humiliating defeat that gave her the courage to leave her tower; if not for him, she would definitely not have left to see the lights that year (remember; she sent Goethe away because she believed the could get Eugene to guide her). In an indirect way, he rescued her.

      Merida totally rejects the whole concept of relying on a prince; to the point that when Disney executives "redesigned" her for the franchise, the public outcry was so great that she got re-redesigned.

      Parents need to sit down with their daughters and point out that Snow White is just 13 and she chooses to make herself useful to the dwarves instead of just relying on their kindness. The prince in this film is barely an afterthought and could easily be interpreted as an angel taking the irrevocably dead princess to Heaven.

      Aurora's room is especially interesting; "this is the 14th century!"... yet she has at least a dozen books in her room; she is wise in the ways of the woods; she is being reared to be a reigning queen and co-queen of two kingdoms and despite her misgivings, she chooses duty over desire and goes to meet her parents.

      Cinderella... well, I ranted about her a pew posts down; IMHO, she represents everything that's wrong with the franchise. Curiously enough; she is the most representative princess in the public eye, so her shortcomings are seen to represent those of all the other princesses even if they are superb role models.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:


      Koji1616 wrote: Actually love is the side part of this she wanted to see the human world way before she saw eric for the first time and even if she risqued becoming a human love is what impulsed her to fo it. she made her own desitions and of the hole damsel in distres she is a stong women aside from getting saved she even shows it in the second movie she didnt think twice of going in the ocean to save her daugter and showing that somtimes u need help from another being represented as a prince it isent bad to get saved and even if u can be strong u also need help thats why she is unique

      Ell, I actually think your wrong. She wouldn't have gone on land if the man wasn't there. If you will contradict, then why didn't she go before she met Eric? And I wouldn't say strong, she didn't seem to actually have a reason for risking her life (most strong people think before frolicking into dangerous situations). Imagine if he was already married? What if he didn't like her (don't pull the "BUT THEIR PURFECT FOR EACHOTHER" gig, she would probably get really disappointed when she finds out that he picks his nose and eats it. Yes, I remember Kristoff. He says that all boys do it)
      Maybe you've forgotten, but Ariel already built up a huge collection (two, if we go by the TV series), and explicitly stated that she wanted to be among humanity as her ultimate dream, and keep in mind that this was BEFORE she even witnessed, much less met Eric. That speaks VOLUMES about Ariel's desire to be among humanity and how strong it was. All Eric did was act as the final push, really. Heck, the writers made it clear that they gave her a fascination with humanity that was powerful enough to not only create at least one impressive collection, but even desire to become human, specifically so they could avert the concept of her only desiring to become human because of Eric. And as far as her not going up before meeting Eric, let's be realistic, the only person besides Ursula who might have the ability to transform Ariel into a human, her father King Triton, won't do so because he hated humans by that point. Even if she wanted to, she most likely has no option, and she definitely would not have gone to Ursula, and pretty much only did so because Flotsam and Jetsam preyed on her then-current distraught emotions (and besides which, she didn't even know that Ursula could do such a thing anyways, so she had no reason to go for her even if she didn't have any qualms). Not to mention it's implied that merpeople cannot actually become humans without magical aid, so even with Ariel's frequent disobedience regarding surfacing, she really can't do much about it.

      And on topic, Ariel may have had Eric as a motive by the halfway point, but Ariel did indeed have something besides Eric that drove her to become human anyways, as established firmly in Part of Your World, heck, even her treasure hunting at that sunken ship, so actually, she's pretty much one of the reasons we even have a Merida, Elsa, and Anna, so, no, they weren't unique. Actually, come to think of it, the only princesses actually concerned with getting a prince as the entirety of their goal were Aurora and possibly Cinderella. Snow White was more concerned about hiding from her murderous stepmother than marrying a prince (and for good reason, really, considering her stepmother tried to have a huntsman try to assassinate her, a huntsman whom turned out to have a conscience and warned her at the last minute to flee. Heck, we could even assume that the Prince and Snow White already knew each other from before the events of the film considering her visited the castle in what was implied to be a recurring instance.), Ariel already had wanted to be with humanity anyways even before she met Eric (and at least Ariel actually managed to stay and secretly observe Eric long enough to get a pretty good idea about his character. Aurora and Cinderella simply fell for their Prince Charming without even doing much observation and just had luck that they turned out to be good guys), Belle basically wanted to escape into literature and go on adventures, Jasmine basically wanted to evade a law of marriage that her father despite being the position of Sultan, couldn't even revoke until late into the film, Pocahontas not only didn't want to marry, but she didn't even marry at all in the first film, Mulan was more concerned about not getting her father killed due to his obviously being dangerously unqualified for soldiering due to an injury he sustained than marrying (not to mention already failed a matchmaking test due to Granny's cricket escaping and causing havoc), Tiana was initially more concerned with getting a job than marrying, Rapunzel moreorless wanted to see floating lights, and that's not even mentioning Merida, Elsa, or Anna (and even Anna is basically an example of what happens if Cinderella or Aurora had the rotten luck of falling in love with a prince who was not so charming to say the very least). So yeah, stop making them out to be unique, because they're not unique in the slightest.

      Are you sure cause many months ago (Novamber 21 to be exact)  I posted a comment on the Disney Princess camment section about seeing a news story about parents not wanting their kids to wait around for their princes and live a life of fairy tails and User: Sings-With-Spirits User:Sings-With-Spirits was one of the users who replyed and he said and I quote.


      I think they are right; the ideal that a girl is incapable of standing up for herself and needs a prince to come rescue her and make her life worthwhile is appalling; this is classically seen in many of the earlier Princess films, though it can be said that as time progressed, the roles definitely changed in the films... but the franchise still babyfied them.

      To wit:

      Snow White, Cinderella and Aurora are, basically, pretty damsels in distress, rescued by their prince. (There are deeper nuances, but we are talking popular perception of the base story).

      Ariel chooses to be a pretty girl with no voice in "man's world" until her prince saves her.

      Belle is seen as a pretty face and not much more in her town; she has a bleak future until SHE rescues the prince (Yaay!) and then HE takes her away from having to live with the uneducated, petty, peasants (back to formula).

      Jasmine lives a boring, sheltered life until her "prince" rescues her from the drudgery by showing her "a whole new world".

      Pocahontas is a major exception... sort of... she ends the film longing for the return of John Smith...

      Mulan totally breaks the mold in her film... but her doll has her in a pretty dress, waiting for her prince to come (I'm not making this up; it is in the back of her doll); the fact that the doll has high-heel-only barbie feet (at least the earlier ones) totally misses the point about the character.

      Tiana had a wonderful dream; a dream that was going to be extremely unlikely... until she rescues the prince (yaay!) and HE makes her dream of opening a high-class restaurant come true. If not for him, her dream would never come true.

      Rapunzel... what would have happened if Eugene had not shown up at her tower? It was his utter and complete humiliating defeat that gave her the courage to leave her tower; if not for him, she would definitely not have left to see the lights that year (remember; she sent Goethe away because she believed the could get Eugene to guide her). In an indirect way, he rescued her.

      Merida totally rejects the whole concept of relying on a prince; to the point that when Disney executives "redesigned" her for the franchise, the public outcry was so great that she got re-redesigned.

      Parents need to sit down with their daughters and point out that Snow White is just 13 and she chooses to make herself useful to the dwarves instead of just relying on their kindness. The prince in this film is barely an afterthought and could easily be interpreted as an angel taking the irrevocably dead princess to Heaven.

      Aurora's room is especially interesting; "this is the 14th century!"... yet she has at least a dozen books in her room; she is wise in the ways of the woods; she is being reared to be a reigning queen and co-queen of two kingdoms and despite her misgivings, she chooses duty over desire and goes to meet her parents.

      Cinderella... well, I ranted about her a pew posts down; IMHO, she represents everything that's wrong with the franchise. Curiously enough; she is the most representative princess in the public eye, so her shortcomings are seen to represent those of all the other princesses even if they are superb role models.

      I can't speak for Aurora or Cinderella (though at least with Aurora and Snow White, they're somewhat justified about waiting for their prince, as they literally have no other option but to do so thanks to... well, you know, being placed into a coma that could only be undone by the kiss of true love), but the other Princesses definitely weren't of the stuff commented on by those "concerned parents." Heck, technically, Ariel did go for the initiative and actually pursued her guy, and had they watched the film fully rather than read a brief transcript, they'd realize that Ariel actually intended to go to the surface anyways regardless of whether Eric was there or not. All he did was act as the final push. Actually, Ariel was more proactive compared to the original tale, who literally only even cared about humanity because of A. a statue of a prince (implied to be the same one she later rescued), and B. to pursue an immortal soul.

      And anyways, they (or at least Snow White, Aurora, and Ariel) were at least better models than their original counterparts. Let's see, Snow White was woken up by sheer dumb luck (and not even a kiss, but basically being dropped and hitting the ground hard enough to spit the poisoned apple out), and from a prince who basically intended to commit necromancy on her before she woke up, Aurora basically was raped by her "savior" (and literally did sleep for 100 years without aging), an ogre prince (and not of the friendly sort as we later discover), and the only reason she woke up was because the aforementioned rape got her pregnant and the pain of having to go into labor was enough to awaken her, Ariel... well, she died from diving into the ocean and forsaking the chance to save herself by stabbing the prince and his lover while they slept, dissolving as well, and has 300 years give or take to earn a soul by being a "daughter of the air.") I'd cite Cinderella, but then I'd be citing the wrong book (Disney's Cinderella was based on the Perrault version, not the Grimm version).

      And you've got to be kidding me about Jasmine: She REFUSED most of her princes even when she knows full well that she's effectively breaking the law to do so (and I mean this literally, as the law actually does say she has to marry a prince before her 16th birthday, which was three days away by the time of the film), we even see a refusal onscreen (well, relatively speaking). It's even implied that she only began to fall for Prince Ali because she deduced that it was actually Aladdin, not even a commoner, but a pauper, and not an actually a prince.

      I can concede your point regarding Mulan, but still...

      I used to be in agreement with those so-called "parents," but I changed my mind a while back after I met one of those so-called "parents," a militant feminist female (I know it sounds redundant, but there are such things as male feminists, so I do have to be specific to make clear of the gender) professor who was willing to bash us males and even implied that women couldn't get an education at all until the 1960s and only males were allowed to be educated at all before then. Similar lies were also uttered and bashing us Christians. I also suggest you read up on "Feminist Fantasy" by Phyllis Schlafly, as she actually addresses this specific point. Most times, I get the feeling that the women want their daughters to be separated from men entirely instead of actually having them work together, even create a matriarchy when one naturally cannot exist anyways.

      EDIT: Also, only Aurora and Snow White actually had to wait for their princes (and again, they weren't unjustified for doing so, as they didn't have much of an option but to do so). The others (yes, even Cinderella, at least regarding the ball) actually did try to be active regarding their prince charmings, and actually, Jasmine drove away potential princes before settling for Aladdin, who isn't of royal blood, or even of common blood, but a beggar. Likewise, Pocahontas also avoided a marriage with Kokhum or whatever his name was, and he was implied to be a "prince" of sorts, and never even marries (at least in the first film. She does in the second, though). Tiana was also depicted as being more competent than her "prince", Naveen, and in fact spent more time trying to save him than him saving her (in fact, this is one of the reasons why The Princess and the Frog is currently ranked on Conservapedia as one of the Worst Liberal Films). Apparently, whoever is criticizing them has neither seen their films nor even bothered to do the proper research, or if they had, clearly they were untrustworthy enough to just dump their findings because it didn't fit their narrative. I'm actually surprised that they are criticizing Belle and Tiana, considering they actually ARE the types they would support (a woman who fits the propaganda of a woman persecuted for the "crime" of being able to read before the 1960s, and a woman pursuing a career over starting a family).

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:



      Koji1616 wrote: Actually love is the side part of this she wanted to see the human world way before she saw eric for the first time and even if she risqued becoming a human love is what impulsed her to fo it. she made her own desitions and of the hole damsel in distres she is a stong women aside from getting saved she even shows it in the second movie she didnt think twice of going in the ocean to save her daugter and showing that somtimes u need help from another being represented as a prince it isent bad to get saved and even if u can be strong u also need help thats why she is unique

      Ell, I actually think your wrong. She wouldn't have gone on land if the man wasn't there. If you will contradict, then why didn't she go before she met Eric? And I wouldn't say strong, she didn't seem to actually have a reason for risking her life (most strong people think before frolicking into dangerous situations). Imagine if he was already married? What if he didn't like her (don't pull the "BUT THEIR PURFECT FOR EACHOTHER" gig, she would probably get really disappointed when she finds out that he picks his nose and eats it. Yes, I remember Kristoff. He says that all boys do it)
      Maybe you've forgotten, but Ariel already built up a huge collection (two, if we go by the TV series), and explicitly stated that she wanted to be among humanity as her ultimate dream, and keep in mind that this was BEFORE she even witnessed, much less met Eric. That speaks VOLUMES about Ariel's desire to be among humanity and how strong it was. All Eric did was act as the final push, really. Heck, the writers made it clear that they gave her a fascination with humanity that was powerful enough to not only create at least one impressive collection, but even desire to become human, specifically so they could avert the concept of her only desiring to become human because of Eric. And as far as her not going up before meeting Eric, let's be realistic, the only person besides Ursula who might have the ability to transform Ariel into a human, her father King Triton, won't do so because he hated humans by that point. Even if she wanted to, she most likely has no option, and she definitely would not have gone to Ursula, and pretty much only did so because Flotsam and Jetsam preyed on her then-current distraught emotions (and besides which, she didn't even know that Ursula could do such a thing anyways, so she had no reason to go for her even if she didn't have any qualms). Not to mention it's implied that merpeople cannot actually become humans without magical aid, so even with Ariel's frequent disobedience regarding surfacing, she really can't do much about it.

      And on topic, Ariel may have had Eric as a motive by the halfway point, but Ariel did indeed have something besides Eric that drove her to become human anyways, as established firmly in Part of Your World, heck, even her treasure hunting at that sunken ship, so actually, she's pretty much one of the reasons we even have a Merida, Elsa, and Anna, so, no, they weren't unique. Actually, come to think of it, the only princesses actually concerned with getting a prince as the entirety of their goal were Aurora and possibly Cinderella. Snow White was more concerned about hiding from her murderous stepmother than marrying a prince (and for good reason, really, considering her stepmother tried to have a huntsman try to assassinate her, a huntsman whom turned out to have a conscience and warned her at the last minute to flee. Heck, we could even assume that the Prince and Snow White already knew each other from before the events of the film considering her visited the castle in what was implied to be a recurring instance.), Ariel already had wanted to be with humanity anyways even before she met Eric (and at least Ariel actually managed to stay and secretly observe Eric long enough to get a pretty good idea about his character. Aurora and Cinderella simply fell for their Prince Charming without even doing much observation and just had luck that they turned out to be good guys), Belle basically wanted to escape into literature and go on adventures, Jasmine basically wanted to evade a law of marriage that her father despite being the position of Sultan, couldn't even revoke until late into the film, Pocahontas not only didn't want to marry, but she didn't even marry at all in the first film, Mulan was more concerned about not getting her father killed due to his obviously being dangerously unqualified for soldiering due to an injury he sustained than marrying (not to mention already failed a matchmaking test due to Granny's cricket escaping and causing havoc), Tiana was initially more concerned with getting a job than marrying, Rapunzel moreorless wanted to see floating lights, and that's not even mentioning Merida, Elsa, or Anna (and even Anna is basically an example of what happens if Cinderella or Aurora had the rotten luck of falling in love with a prince who was not so charming to say the very least). So yeah, stop making them out to be unique, because they're not unique in the slightest.

      Are you sure cause many months ago (Novamber 21 to be exact)  I posted a comment on the Disney Princess camment section about seeing a news story about parents not wanting their kids to wait around for their princes and live a life of fairy tails and User: Sings-With-Spirits User:Sings-With-Spirits was one of the users who replyed and he said and I quote.


      I think they are right; the ideal that a girl is incapable of standing up for herself and needs a prince to come rescue her and make her life worthwhile is appalling; this is classically seen in many of the earlier Princess films, though it can be said that as time progressed, the roles definitely changed in the films... but the franchise still babyfied them.

      To wit:

      Snow White, Cinderella and Aurora are, basically, pretty damsels in distress, rescued by their prince. (There are deeper nuances, but we are talking popular perception of the base story).

      Ariel chooses to be a pretty girl with no voice in "man's world" until her prince saves her.

      Belle is seen as a pretty face and not much more in her town; she has a bleak future until SHE rescues the prince (Yaay!) and then HE takes her away from having to live with the uneducated, petty, peasants (back to formula).

      Jasmine lives a boring, sheltered life until her "prince" rescues her from the drudgery by showing her "a whole new world".

      Pocahontas is a major exception... sort of... she ends the film longing for the return of John Smith...

      Mulan totally breaks the mold in her film... but her doll has her in a pretty dress, waiting for her prince to come (I'm not making this up; it is in the back of her doll); the fact that the doll has high-heel-only barbie feet (at least the earlier ones) totally misses the point about the character.

      Tiana had a wonderful dream; a dream that was going to be extremely unlikely... until she rescues the prince (yaay!) and HE makes her dream of opening a high-class restaurant come true. If not for him, her dream would never come true.

      Rapunzel... what would have happened if Eugene had not shown up at her tower? It was his utter and complete humiliating defeat that gave her the courage to leave her tower; if not for him, she would definitely not have left to see the lights that year (remember; she sent Goethe away because she believed the could get Eugene to guide her). In an indirect way, he rescued her.

      Merida totally rejects the whole concept of relying on a prince; to the point that when Disney executives "redesigned" her for the franchise, the public outcry was so great that she got re-redesigned.

      Parents need to sit down with their daughters and point out that Snow White is just 13 and she chooses to make herself useful to the dwarves instead of just relying on their kindness. The prince in this film is barely an afterthought and could easily be interpreted as an angel taking the irrevocably dead princess to Heaven.

      Aurora's room is especially interesting; "this is the 14th century!"... yet she has at least a dozen books in her room; she is wise in the ways of the woods; she is being reared to be a reigning queen and co-queen of two kingdoms and despite her misgivings, she chooses duty over desire and goes to meet her parents.

      Cinderella... well, I ranted about her a pew posts down; IMHO, she represents everything that's wrong with the franchise. Curiously enough; she is the most representative princess in the public eye, so her shortcomings are seen to represent those of all the other princesses even if they are superb role models.

      I can't speak for Aurora or Cinderella (though at least with Aurora and Snow White, they're somewhat justified about waiting for their prince, as they literally have no other option but to do so thanks to... well, you know, being placed into a coma that could only be undone by the kiss of true love), but the other Princesses definitely weren't of the stuff commented on by those "concerned parents." Heck, technically, Ariel did go for the initiative and actually pursued her guy, and had they watched the film fully rather than read a brief transcript, they'd realize that Ariel actually intended to go to the surface anyways regardless of whether Eric was there or not. All he did was act as the final push. Actually, Ariel was more proactive compared to the original tale, who literally only even cared about humanity because of A. a statue of a prince (implied to be the same one she later rescued), and B. to pursue an immortal soul.

      And anyways, they (or at least Snow White, Aurora, and Ariel) were at least better models than their original counterparts. Let's see, Snow White was woken up by sheer dumb luck (and not even a kiss, but basically being dropped and hitting the ground hard enough to spit the poisoned apple out), and from a prince who basically intended to commit necromancy on her before she woke up, Aurora basically was raped by her "savior" (and literally did sleep for 100 years without aging), an ogre prince (and not of the friendly sort as we later discover), and the only reason she woke up was because the aforementioned rape got her pregnant and the pain of having to go into labor was enough to awaken her, Ariel... well, she died from diving into the ocean and forsaking the chance to save herself by stabbing the prince and his lover while they slept, dissolving as well, and has 300 years give or take to earn a soul by being a "daughter of the air.") I'd cite Cinderella, but then I'd be citing the wrong book (Disney's Cinderella was based on the Perrault version, not the Grimm version).

      And you've got to be kidding me about Jasmine: She REFUSED most of her princes even when she knows full well that she's effectively breaking the law to do so (and I mean this literally, as the law actually does say she has to marry a prince before her 16th birthday, which was three days away by the time of the film), we even see a refusal onscreen (well, relatively speaking). It's even implied that she only began to fall for Prince Ali because she deduced that it was actually Aladdin, not even a commoner, but a pauper, and not an actually a prince.

      I can concede your point regarding Mulan, but still...

      I used to be in agreement with those so-called "parents," but I changed my mind a while back after I met one of those so-called "parents," a militant feminist female (I know it sounds redundant, but there are such things as male feminists, so I do have to be specific to make clear of the gender) professor who was willing to bash us males and even implied that women couldn't get an education at all until the 1960s and only males were allowed to be educated at all before then. Similar lies were also uttered and bashing us Christians. I also suggest you read up on "Feminist Fantasy" by Phyllis Schlafly, as she actually addresses this specific point. Most times, I get the feeling that the women want their daughters to be separated from men entirely instead of actually having them work together, even create a matriarchy when one naturally cannot exist anyways.

      EDIT: Also, only Aurora and Snow White actually had to wait for their princes (and again, they weren't unjustified for doing so, as they didn't have much of an option but to do so). The others (yes, even Cinderella, at least regarding the ball) actually did try to be active regarding their prince charmings, and actually, Jasmine drove away potential princes before settling for Aladdin, who isn't of royal blood, or even of common blood, but a beggar. Likewise, Pocahontas also avoided a marriage with Kokhum or whatever his name was, and he was implied to be a "prince" of sorts, and never even marries (at least in the first film. She does in the second, though). Tiana was also depicted as being more competent than her "prince", Naveen, and in fact spent more time trying to save him than him saving her (in fact, this is one of the reasons why The Princess and the Frog is currently ranked on Conservapedia as one of the Worst Liberal Films). Apparently, whoever is criticizing them has neither seen their films nor even bothered to do the proper research, or if they had, clearly they were untrustworthy enough to just dump their findings because it didn't fit their narrative. I'm actually surprised that they are criticizing Belle and Tiana, considering they actually ARE the types they would support (a woman who fits the propaganda of a woman persecuted for the "crime" of being able to read before the 1960s, and a woman pursuing a career over starting a family).

      Their are also websites that say the other Princess represent stereotyps like this http://mic.com/articles/88167/9-harmful-stereotypes-we-never-realized-our-favorite-disney-movies-taught-us and this http://filmandmedia12.wikispaces.com/Gender+Roles+and+Stereotypes+Found+in+Disney+Films.

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    • I won't read the whole tread, but I'm going to say that no, Aurora, Cinderella and Snow White don't have the same personality. At least, not according to my personal opinion. I respect if you think otherwise, but these three princesses are awfully overlooked and people always think Ariel and Belle are the first princesses to have personality and do something for themselves.

      Snow White: kind (the standart affilated-with-good Disney character's trait - Surprise!), optimistic, cheerful/bubbly, motherly, playful, resilient, independent, somewhat sassy, naive insecure (wants to be loved) yet confident at the same time, bossy, manipulative (not in a bad way), etc.

      Cinderella: Mature, hopeful (but much more of a realist than Snow White), charitable, daydreamer, sarcastic, somewhat bitter and revengeful, stoic

      Aurora: Gentle (softspoken), playful, obedient, dutiful, elegant/regal, philosophical, romantic (the most out of the DPs, imo), slight lack of backbone, pessimistic.

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    • Silverrose1991 wrote: I won't read the whole tread, but I'm going to say that no, Aurora, Cinderella and Snow White don't have the same personality. At least, not according to my personal opinion. I respect if you think otherwise, but these three princesses are awfully overlooked and people always think Ariel and Belle are the first princesses to have personality and do something for themselves.

      Snow White: kind (the standart affilated-with-good Disney character's trait - Surprise!), optimistic, cheerful/bubbly, motherly, playful, resilient, independent, somewhat sassy, naive insecure (wants to be loved) yet confident at the same time, bossy, manipulative (not in a bad way), etc.

      Cinderella: Mature, hopeful (but much more of a realist than Snow White), charitable, daydreamer, sarcastic, somewhat bitter and revengeful, stoic

      Aurora: Gentle (softspoken), playful, obedient, dutiful, elegant/regal, philosophical, romantic (the most out of the DPs, imo), slight lack of backbone, pessimistic.

      I agree about their having personalities. All those things do apply as personality traits, after all. I'm not so sure about whether they are the first to do things for themselves though (though at least with Aurora and Snow White, it's a bit justified as they don't exactly have any options to do anything else but wait thanks to being in comas).

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Silverrose1991 wrote: I won't read the whole tread, but I'm going to say that no, Aurora, Cinderella and Snow White don't have the same personality. At least, not according to my personal opinion. I respect if you think otherwise, but these three princesses are awfully overlooked and people always think Ariel and Belle are the first princesses to have personality and do something for themselves.

      Snow White: kind (the standart affilated-with-good Disney character's trait - Surprise!), optimistic, cheerful/bubbly, motherly, playful, resilient, independent, somewhat sassy, naive insecure (wants to be loved) yet confident at the same time, bossy, manipulative (not in a bad way), etc.

      Cinderella: Mature, hopeful (but much more of a realist than Snow White), charitable, daydreamer, sarcastic, somewhat bitter and revengeful, stoic

      Aurora: Gentle (softspoken), playful, obedient, dutiful, elegant/regal, philosophical, romantic (the most out of the DPs, imo), slight lack of backbone, pessimistic.

      I agree about their having personalities. All those things do apply as personality traits, after all. I'm not so sure about whether they are the first to do things for themselves though (though at least with Aurora and Snow White, it's a bit justified as they don't exactly have any options to do anything else but wait thanks to being in comas).


      Well, Cinderella and Snow White surely did things for themselves. After finding herself lost in the woods, Snow immediately (after singing the obligatory cheering song) thought of finding a place to stay. She even earned her keep in the Dwarfs's home. Unlike most people think, she is no air-head bimbo, at least not imo.

      Cinderella actively tried to attend the ball, reminding Lady Tremaine that "every elegible maiden is to attend". Unfortunately, she couldn't do it on her own, as her stepfamily burdened her with chores. However, in the end, she still helped in her rescue from the attic, telling the birds to fetch Bruno. Without her intervention, the operation would have turned out unsuccessful.

      About Aurora, she didn't really do anything for herself, but then again, she is not the protagonist, even if she is the title character. This role clearly belongs to the fairies. Even then, it was admirable enough of her to return to the castle, willing to fullfill her role as a future queen even if it hurt.

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    • Silverrose1991 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Silverrose1991 wrote: I won't read the whole tread, but I'm going to say that no, Aurora, Cinderella and Snow White don't have the same personality. At least, not according to my personal opinion. I respect if you think otherwise, but these three princesses are awfully overlooked and people always think Ariel and Belle are the first princesses to have personality and do something for themselves.

      Snow White: kind (the standart affilated-with-good Disney character's trait - Surprise!), optimistic, cheerful/bubbly, motherly, playful, resilient, independent, somewhat sassy, naive insecure (wants to be loved) yet confident at the same time, bossy, manipulative (not in a bad way), etc.

      Cinderella: Mature, hopeful (but much more of a realist than Snow White), charitable, daydreamer, sarcastic, somewhat bitter and revengeful, stoic

      Aurora: Gentle (softspoken), playful, obedient, dutiful, elegant/regal, philosophical, romantic (the most out of the DPs, imo), slight lack of backbone, pessimistic.

      I agree about their having personalities. All those things do apply as personality traits, after all. I'm not so sure about whether they are the first to do things for themselves though (though at least with Aurora and Snow White, it's a bit justified as they don't exactly have any options to do anything else but wait thanks to being in comas).


      Well, Cinderella and Snow White surely did things for themselves. After finding herself lost in the woods, Snow immediately (after singing the obligatory cheering song) thought of finding a place to stay. She even earned her keep in the Dwarfs's home. Unlike most people think, she is no air-head bimbo, at least not imo.

      Cinderella actively tried to attend the ball, reminding Lady Tremaine that "every elegible maiden is to attend". Unfortunately, she couldn't do it on her own, as her stepfamily burdened her with chores. However, in the end, she still helped in her rescue from the attic, telling the birds to fetch Bruno. Without her intervention, the operation would have turned out unsuccessful.

      About Aurora, she didn't really do anything for herself, but then again, she is not the protagonist, even if she is the title character. This role clearly belongs to the fairies. Even then, it was admirable enough of her to return to the castle, willing to fullfill her role as a future queen even if it hurt.

      Okay. Point taken. And come to think of it, agreed with you regarding Snow White not being an air-headed bimbo, or at least a bimbo. The definition of a bimbo is someone who uses their body to get what they want, and, well, its clear she isn't that (not consciously, at least). Actually, despite their official names being "the Bimbettes", the triplets from BATB don't even fit that at all (as there's no indication they even slept with Gaston, or slept with the male villagers for that matter, and even their crush on Gaston is a bit closer to true love than shallow love, if we go by the comics' implication that they crushed on Gaston since they were children).

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    • And how would one suggest that Mulan is like the others? That statement makes no sense.

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    • Well, what about Mulan? If you are counting Anna, Elsa and Merida, then why leave Mulan? In fact, even Tiana. Moreover, Mulan is the first Disney Princess of that kind of personality. O.O I wonder why you left her out.

      And, every DP is unique. You don't have to be strong and fierce to be different. Everyone just can't be the same.

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    • I love Mulan- exactly what I mean. And yes, I love Mulan too.

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    • I hate how everyone thinks that Frozen is the first disney movie to teach girl that they don't need a man to save them. It's NOT true.

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    • Yeah! They say that since Elsa didn't ahve a Prince, the movie teaches you that you don't need a man.

      Wait, did Merida have a prince? No! :O I am amazed at how they forgot that. Mulan also didn't take the help of a man for achieving her goals. :/

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    • I love mulan wrote: Yeah! They say that since Elsa didn't ahve a Prince, the movie teaches you that you don't need a man.

      Wait, did Merida have a prince? No! :O I am amazed at how they forgot that. Mulan also didn't take the help of a man for achieving her goals. :/

      Yeah, and if you want to get technical, Belle didn't take the help of a man for achieving her goals as well (since Beast wasn't human [during those points she needed help, anyways]). Pocahontas, at least in the first film, didn't necessarily need John Smith and she never actually went with him in the ending of the film.

      I do have large problems with women wanting absolute separation from men as liberation, though, especially when several so-called feminists basically bashed many of us males when many times we didn't even deserve it.

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    • Frozenfangirl wrote: I hate how everyone thinks that Frozen is the first disney movie to teach girl that they don't need a man to save them. It's NOT true.

      The "Honest Commercial for Frozen" captured how wrong Frozen did it. To closely quote it, it said "Frozen teaches girls that they don't need a prince to save them because all men are either greedy thiefs, sociopathic killers, or smelly loners." Of course, this isn't true, but pretty much what frozen tells us.

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: I hate how everyone thinks that Frozen is the first disney movie to teach girl that they don't need a man to save them. It's NOT true.

      The "Honest Commercial for Frozen" captured how wrong Frozen did it. To closely quote it, it said "Frozen teaches girls that they don't need a prince to save them because all men are either greedy thiefs, sociopathic killers, or smelly loners." Of course, this isn't true, but pretty much what frozen tells us.

      Yeah, and you can thank militant feminism for the preaching of this message. I had to suffer from a few teachers of both genders pushing that lie about us males, and lies about us Christians as well. And to be honest, to some extent, Beauty and the Beast preaches something similar in the end anyways, as did Princess and the Frog. At least those movies did give men some redeemability, though. Frozen failed in that regard. They probably should fix that with the sequel to Frozen (which they plan on doing anyhow).

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: I hate how everyone thinks that Frozen is the first disney movie to teach girl that they don't need a man to save them. It's NOT true.

      The "Honest Commercial for Frozen" captured how wrong Frozen did it. To closely quote it, it said "Frozen teaches girls that they don't need a prince to save them because all men are either greedy thiefs, sociopathic killers, or smelly loners." Of course, this isn't true, but pretty much what frozen tells us.

      Yeah, and you can thank militant feminism for the preaching of this message. I had to suffer from a few teachers of both genders pushing that lie about us males, and lies about us Christians as well. And to be honest, to some extent, Beauty and the Beast preaches something similar in the end anyways, as did Princess and the Frog. At least those movies did give men some redeemability, though. Frozen failed in that regard. They probably should fix that with the sequel to Frozen (which they plan on doing anyhow).

      I agree. It's kind of sad how nobody wants Hans to be redeemed. I think he has not only great secondary protagonist possibility. He is obviously smart and connected, and is just an overall interesting character (I actually prefer him over Elsa, for the reason that Elsa seems really flat to me. She's kind of another reason for Disney to prove the "women don't need men to be happy" point, which of course, has been overdone quite recently)

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: I hate how everyone thinks that Frozen is the first disney movie to teach girl that they don't need a man to save them. It's NOT true.

      The "Honest Commercial for Frozen" captured how wrong Frozen did it. To closely quote it, it said "Frozen teaches girls that they don't need a prince to save them because all men are either greedy thiefs, sociopathic killers, or smelly loners." Of course, this isn't true, but pretty much what frozen tells us.

      Yeah, and you can thank militant feminism for the preaching of this message. I had to suffer from a few teachers of both genders pushing that lie about us males, and lies about us Christians as well. And to be honest, to some extent, Beauty and the Beast preaches something similar in the end anyways, as did Princess and the Frog. At least those movies did give men some redeemability, though. Frozen failed in that regard. They probably should fix that with the sequel to Frozen (which they plan on doing anyhow).

      I agree. It's kind of sad how nobody wants Hans to be redeemed. I think he has not only great secondary protagonist possibility. He is obviously smart and connected, and is just an overall interesting character (I actually prefer him over Elsa, for the reason that Elsa seems really flat to me. She's kind of another reason for Disney to prove the "women don't need men to be happy" point, which of course, has been overdone quite recently)

      I think this trend frankly started with Belle and Beauty and the Beast. Ariel may have been more self-assertive than the three prior Disney Princesses, but at least she does want to go get married (and what's so bad about wanting to marry men and all that, anyways. I noticed that since Beauty and the Beast, marriage is actually being treated as a woman's worst nightmare.) and doesn't view her own race as being inferior to herself. And Hans' actions do make redeemability extremely difficult, but not impossible. After all, Iago came up with the plan for Jafar to marry into the throne and then kill Jasmine and the Sultan afterwards, and was pretty despicable throughout the film, yet he ended up redeemed in Return of Jafar, even becoming a genuine friend of Jasmine, so if someone like Iago could do it, Hans most certainly can as well.

      And even when I was still a feminist, I never dreamed of making women completely segregated from men. I just wanted to fix what I thought were injustices, although now I realize I may have been duped. I was more of a Susan B. Anthony-type, wanting women to have some more freedoms while at the same time still have men and women be devoted to each other. I definitely would not have supported second-wave or, heck, third-wave feminism back then. I don't like despicable treatment of women or women suffering, and do sincerely desire to put an end to suffering, but at the same time, I won't tolerate us men being treated like trash or us males having to suffer at the hands of misandrists. I had to suffer that since Spring 2011 in my college career up to Spring 2014 at the hands of leftists, and what's worse, they bashed my Christianity.

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    • Koji1616 wrote: i think ariel is preaty unique she wasent looking for love she wated to see the human world and she wanted adventure its just that she fell in love with a guy that represented everithing that the human world could bring her this is why in the trivia section she is put in the rebelius section when it comes to how they are devided just cause she plaid damsel at one pointy  dosent mean she aint unique i mean she had eough courage to push ursula when ursula tranformed her father and even tho the clasic princesses bearly show spunkyness dosent mean they arent unique they all had diferent roles in there fils showing u that things can change no mater ur sircumstancess.

      Indeed, for Ariel, Eric was just the icing on top of the cake.

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    • I'm not being a hater, but I always thought it was stalkerish for Areil to fall in love with Eric and wanted to find out where he lived. I also thought Disney didn't do a very good adaption of the book, because in the book she has to kill him because he was in love with another girl, and instead jumped into the ocean and turned into sea foam. Moral: Listen to what your parents tell you, or else you wil die. :P

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    • Frozenfangirl wrote: I'm not being a hater, but I always thought it was stalkerish for Areil to fall in love with Eric and wanted to find out where he lived. I also thought Disney didn't do a very good adaption of the book, because in the book she has to kill him because he was in love with another girl, and instead jumped into the ocean and turned into sea foam. Moral: Listen to what your parents tell you, or else you wil die. :P

      To be honest, the original book wasn't much better. Considering the little mermaid actually hurt a lot of people with her actions, even her sacrifice really hurt her prince (since, marrying her or not, he did value her as a sister), and she was given a chance at gaining an immortal soul after undergoing what amounts to roughly three centuries of being a daughter of the air, it honestly seemed like she got away with her selfishness. Plus, the original little mermaid's motives for the prince were even more shallow: Literally the only reason she saved the prince was because he looked just like a statue of hers, and considering she cared more about getting a soul than the prince himself... yeah. Had I been Andersen, I'd have God give her a soul, only to then throw her into hell for her selfish actions, even with her sacrifice. Also, in the original book, her parents never actually banned her from the surface.

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    • So you say, that you would want a dead Ariel. If you look at it this way other Disney movies are pretty bad as well. The queen in snow white would have been in love with snow white, but snow white rejected and that's why the queen got angry. Aurora would have been raped. Belle wouldn't love the beast because she was eaten. Flynn would have become blind. The evil sisters from snow white would have cut their toes and eventually killed themselves.All the movies have changed stories but we love them..

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    • Orlando678 wrote: So you say, that you would want a dead Ariel. If you look at it this way other Disney movies are pretty bad as well. The queen in snow white would have been in love with snow white, but snow white rejected and that's why the queen got angry. Aurora would have been raped. Belle wouldn't love the beast because she was eaten. Flynn would have become blind. The evil sisters from snow white would have cut their toes and eventually killed themselves.All the movies have changed stories but we love them..

      If you were talking to me, that wasn't what I want at all.

      And actually, I don't think Belle was even eaten in the original tale, and Disney's Cinderella would have been based on the Perrault version, not the Grimm version, meaning, no, the stepsisters definitely wouldn't have their feet cut off (and it is Cinderella, not Snow White).

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: I'm not being a hater, but I always thought it was stalkerish for Areil to fall in love with Eric and wanted to find out where he lived. I also thought Disney didn't do a very good adaption of the book, because in the book she has to kill him because he was in love with another girl, and instead jumped into the ocean and turned into sea foam. Moral: Listen to what your parents tell you, or else you wil die. :P

      To be honest, the original book wasn't much better. Considering the little mermaid actually hurt a lot of people with her actions, even her sacrifice really hurt her prince (since, marrying her or not, he did value her as a sister), and she was given a chance at gaining an immortal soul after undergoing what amounts to roughly three centuries of being a daughter of the air, it honestly seemed like she got away with her selfishness. Plus, the original little mermaid's motives for the prince were even more shallow: Literally the only reason she saved the prince was because he looked just like a statue of hers, and considering she cared more about getting a soul than the prince himself... yeah. Had I been Andersen, I'd have God give her a soul, only to then throw her into hell for her selfish actions, even with her sacrifice. Also, in the original book, her parents never actually banned her from the surface.

      Guys, Disney changed it to a happily ever after, because they thought kids would like it more. I definitely did, seeing as I now love The Little Mermaid as a fairytale.

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    • Lilymoth wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: I'm not being a hater, but I always thought it was stalkerish for Areil to fall in love with Eric and wanted to find out where he lived. I also thought Disney didn't do a very good adaption of the book, because in the book she has to kill him because he was in love with another girl, and instead jumped into the ocean and turned into sea foam. Moral: Listen to what your parents tell you, or else you wil die. :P

      To be honest, the original book wasn't much better. Considering the little mermaid actually hurt a lot of people with her actions, even her sacrifice really hurt her prince (since, marrying her or not, he did value her as a sister), and she was given a chance at gaining an immortal soul after undergoing what amounts to roughly three centuries of being a daughter of the air, it honestly seemed like she got away with her selfishness. Plus, the original little mermaid's motives for the prince were even more shallow: Literally the only reason she saved the prince was because he looked just like a statue of hers, and considering she cared more about getting a soul than the prince himself... yeah. Had I been Andersen, I'd have God give her a soul, only to then throw her into hell for her selfish actions, even with her sacrifice. Also, in the original book, her parents never actually banned her from the surface.

      Guys, Disney changed it to a happily ever after, because they thought kids would like it more. I definitely did, seeing as I now love The Little Mermaid as a fairytale.

      I wasn't disagreeing with you, just pointing out that the original tale didn't seem to work out well in its moral.

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    • I agree with you, I clicked the wrong box, I apologize.

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    • Orlando678 wrote:
      So you say, that you would want a dead Ariel. If you look at it this way other Disney movies are pretty bad as well. The queen in snow white would have been in love with snow white, but snow white rejected and that's why the queen got angry. Aurora would have been raped. Belle wouldn't love the beast because she was eaten. Flynn would have become blind. The evil sisters from snow white would have cut their toes and eventually killed themselves.All the movies have changed stories but we love them..

      I'm not saying that. I'm just saying I don't like how Ariel disobeyed her dad and got what she wanted in the end. I was raised to listen to my parents so.. yeah.

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    • Frozenfangirl wrote:

      Orlando678 wrote:
      So you say, that you would want a dead Ariel. If you look at it this way other Disney movies are pretty bad as well. The queen in snow white would have been in love with snow white, but snow white rejected and that's why the queen got angry. Aurora would have been raped. Belle wouldn't love the beast because she was eaten. Flynn would have become blind. The evil sisters from snow white would have cut their toes and eventually killed themselves.All the movies have changed stories but we love them..

      I'm not saying that. I'm just saying I don't like how Ariel disobeyed her dad and got what she wanted in the end. I was raised to listen to my parents so.. yeah.

      If your parents told you to kill a lot of people just because they didn't like them, even if those people did absolutely nothing to wrong them, would you do it? I'm only asking because Triton did hate humans, and some of his comments regarding humans did indicate that he at the very least wouldn't particularly care if they died, if not preferred if they died. Yes, listening to parents is generally good, but if your parents also happened to be genocidal, there are instances where you really shouldn't have to listen to your parents.

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    • He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

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    • Belle was actually eaten in the original story... And I'm sorry for the typo. Don't forget the actual moral, if you believe in your dreams , chase them and you can only hope that it comes true.

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    • As I said, I don't want to be a hater. :)

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    • Yeah, I hate the statement about Frozen teaching about guys too. I don't think it teaches all men are bad because of Kristoff, but it is not even teaching you don't need men relly, because they believed Kristoff was the solution and it just happened not to be. Maybe the audience can see iut, but the characters had to see it on accident. Mulan on the other hand proves this theory the entire time, but never puts men down either. It's more of an everyone should have an equal chance and equal rights kind of thing, defying all kinds of descrimination. You can tell because the whole army developed, and they learned and helped each other. All the people were respectable (besides comic relief I mean) whether male or female. Both could me mean or nice, sexist or not.

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    • Frozen is a good thing. It is already showed that Brave and frozen are getting other meanings of love and respect. These stories are about respecting and loving family. This is learning us something

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    • Orlando678 wrote: Belle was actually eaten in the original story... And I'm sorry for the typo. Don't forget the actual moral, if you believe in your dreams , chase them and you can only hope that it comes true.

      Hmm... odd. Neither the Beaumont nor the Villeneuve tale indicated this. Must have been an even earlier story that even Wikipedia did not note...

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    • I do love Frozen, don't get me wrong, but it's not the first for everything.

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    • With Brave, I really like Merida, but at the same time her flat out rebelliousness deters me away and the movie isn't as good as it should be. 

      Mulan easily teaches about love for family as well as individuality.

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    • Beauty and the Beast is actually pretty accurate, except for some uninteresting details (like how Belle's father used to be rich, but got himself into major debt). There is ONE unfortunate detail that the story DOES leave out. In the first believed version of the tale (by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve), Belle has two wicked sisters (lots of wicked family members in fairy tales, unfortunately). The Beast allows Belle to travel home, as long as she is only gone for a week. Her sisters are extremely jealous to hear about her luxurious life, and try to persuade Belle to stay with them longer than a week, in the hopes that the Beast will be infuriated with Belle and eat her alive upon her return. Yikes. The Beast actually ate Belle...

      this is what I found

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    • Orlando678 wrote: Beauty and the Beast is actually pretty accurate, except for some uninteresting details (like how Belle's father used to be rich, but got himself into major debt). There is ONE unfortunate detail that the story DOES leave out. In the first believed version of the tale (by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve), Belle has two wicked sisters (lots of wicked family members in fairy tales, unfortunately). The Beast allows Belle to travel home, as long as she is only gone for a week. Her sisters are extremely jealous to hear about her luxurious life, and try to persuade Belle to stay with them longer than a week, in the hopes that the Beast will be infuriated with Belle and eat her alive upon her return. Yikes. The Beast actually ate Belle...

      this is what I found

      "In the hopes," that means the wicked sisters did believe he would do so. It didn't actually happen in the story, however. In fact, the Beast nearly died of a broken heart, and only found the will to live upon finding Belle did return.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Just out of curiosity if Mulan and Pocahontas were as unique as Merida, Anna and Elsa then why are Merida, Elsa and Anna so popular among the franchise while I read somewhare that Pocahontas and Mulan were the least popular? 

      Marketing. Nearly everything in a franchise depends on marketing strategies and how well they sell. Since Merida, Anna, and Elsa are still new and fresh in girls minds they will sell better, and be newer than some of the old ones. 

       

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Orlando678 wrote: Beauty and the Beast is actually pretty accurate, except for some uninteresting details (like how Belle's father used to be rich, but got himself into major debt). There is ONE unfortunate detail that the story DOES leave out. In the first believed version of the tale (by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve), Belle has two wicked sisters (lots of wicked family members in fairy tales, unfortunately). The Beast allows Belle to travel home, as long as she is only gone for a week. Her sisters are extremely jealous to hear about her luxurious life, and try to persuade Belle to stay with them longer than a week, in the hopes that the Beast will be infuriated with Belle and eat her alive upon her return. Yikes. The Beast actually ate Belle...

      this is what I found

      "In the hopes," that means the wicked sisters did believe he would do so. It didn't actually happen in the story, however. In fact, the Beast nearly died of a broken heart, and only found the will to live upon finding Belle did return.

      read the last sentence

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    • Orlando678 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Orlando678 wrote: Beauty and the Beast is actually pretty accurate, except for some uninteresting details (like how Belle's father used to be rich, but got himself into major debt). There is ONE unfortunate detail that the story DOES leave out. In the first believed version of the tale (by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve), Belle has two wicked sisters (lots of wicked family members in fairy tales, unfortunately). The Beast allows Belle to travel home, as long as she is only gone for a week. Her sisters are extremely jealous to hear about her luxurious life, and try to persuade Belle to stay with them longer than a week, in the hopes that the Beast will be infuriated with Belle and eat her alive upon her return. Yikes. The Beast actually ate Belle...

      this is what I found

      "In the hopes," that means the wicked sisters did believe he would do so. It didn't actually happen in the story, however. In fact, the Beast nearly died of a broken heart, and only found the will to live upon finding Belle did return.

      read the last sentence

      Yeah, I read it. Problem is, that sort of thing is noted on Belle's article and even that made sure to also note that, contrary to what her sisters hoped, Belle DIDN'T end up eaten by the Beast and in fact the Beast nearly died from a broken heart, only regaining the will to live upon her doing things per his instructions. The only characters who truly met a very bad end were in fact her sisters (being transformed into statues by a fairy, only being released once they recognized their faults).

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    • I have found different sources which said that Belle was eaten.... but let´s get back to the point that it´s good that disney changed the storylines.

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    • Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

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    • It was such a harsh and sad moment when Triton ruined all that Ariel had collected

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Agreed. But it's revealed in Ariel's Beginning that his wife was killed in a shipwreck. I think though, that's no reason to hate humans.

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    • Lilymoth wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Agreed. But it's revealed in Ariel's Beginning that his wife was killed in a shipwreck. I think though, that's no reason to hate humans.

      Technically, if we go by The Little Mermaid original film, it was already implied that she had been speared and presumably devoured by humans due to Triton's comments about "harpoon-wielding fish eaters" in reference to humanity. That being said, regardless of his reason why he hated humanity, basically callously dismissing the death of a human who, BTW was in no position to defend himself or even save himself is actually somewhat cold, even for Triton.

      And I'd prefer to ignore Ariel's Beginning due to it constantly making extremely unnecessary changes and making unnecessary omissions (especially for it being a prequel film to the first movie). For starters, Ariel's responsible for saving music in Atlantica, yet for some reason her sisters are allowed to join a band yet she has to wait a full year, and they not only completely altered Flounder's personality completely, they don't even bother to give an explanation as to how he became a nervous wreck.

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Well, let's think of this another way. Triton thinks humans are dangerous and quite close to animals (by the sound of it). So, imagine a dangerous animal (don't know what you consider dangerous, so I will just leave it at that) that there are a lot of. One dies. And of course, the less there are, the more chances you will survive. Is this callous and warped? A little. Is it true? Most likely. Of course, we have the Ariels out there who take large lengths to protect them.

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Well, let's think of this another way. Triton thinks humans are dangerous and quite close to animals (by the sound of it). So, imagine a dangerous animal (don't know what you consider dangerous, so I will just leave it at that) that there are a lot of. One dies. And of course, the less there are, the more chances you will survive. Is this callous and warped? A little. Is it true? Most likely. Of course, we have the Ariels out there who take large lengths to protect them.

      Yes, except the problem is that 1. Eric was unconscious and thus not even a threat to Ariel at that moment, and 2. Even when he woke up and saw Ariel, he only got a brief glimpse of her, and the lighting and position Ariel was currently at would give (and had given) Eric the reasonable assumption that Ariel had been a human girl, rather than a mermaid, thus not actually making him a threat to Ariel in either case.

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    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Well, let's think of this another way. Triton thinks humans are dangerous and quite close to animals (by the sound of it). So, imagine a dangerous animal (don't know what you consider dangerous, so I will just leave it at that) that there are a lot of. One dies. And of course, the less there are, the more chances you will survive. Is this callous and warped? A little. Is it true? Most likely. Of course, we have the Ariels out there who take large lengths to protect them.

      Yes, except the problem is that 1. Eric was unconscious and thus not even a threat to Ariel at that moment, and 2. Even when he woke up and saw Ariel, he only got a brief glimpse of her, and the lighting and position Ariel was currently at would give (and had given) Eric the reasonable assumption that Ariel had been a human girl, rather than a mermaid, thus not actually making him a threat to Ariel in either case.

      Yes, but did the dad know this?(sorry, haven't seen the Little Mermaid in a while)

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Well, let's think of this another way. Triton thinks humans are dangerous and quite close to animals (by the sound of it). So, imagine a dangerous animal (don't know what you consider dangerous, so I will just leave it at that) that there are a lot of. One dies. And of course, the less there are, the more chances you will survive. Is this callous and warped? A little. Is it true? Most likely. Of course, we have the Ariels out there who take large lengths to protect them.

      Yes, except the problem is that 1. Eric was unconscious and thus not even a threat to Ariel at that moment, and 2. Even when he woke up and saw Ariel, he only got a brief glimpse of her, and the lighting and position Ariel was currently at would give (and had given) Eric the reasonable assumption that Ariel had been a human girl, rather than a mermaid, thus not actually making him a threat to Ariel in either case.

      Yes, but did the dad know this?(sorry, haven't seen the Little Mermaid in a while)

      He at least knew that Eric had been unconscious, considering he mentioned that Ariel saved him from drowning.

        Loading editor
    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Well, let's think of this another way. Triton thinks humans are dangerous and quite close to animals (by the sound of it). So, imagine a dangerous animal (don't know what you consider dangerous, so I will just leave it at that) that there are a lot of. One dies. And of course, the less there are, the more chances you will survive. Is this callous and warped? A little. Is it true? Most likely. Of course, we have the Ariels out there who take large lengths to protect them.

      Yes, except the problem is that 1. Eric was unconscious and thus not even a threat to Ariel at that moment, and 2. Even when he woke up and saw Ariel, he only got a brief glimpse of her, and the lighting and position Ariel was currently at would give (and had given) Eric the reasonable assumption that Ariel had been a human girl, rather than a mermaid, thus not actually making him a threat to Ariel in either case.

      Yes, but did the dad know this?(sorry, haven't seen the Little Mermaid in a while)

      He at least knew that Eric had been unconscious, considering he mentioned that Ariel saved him from drowning.

      Okay. But of course, I think that he might have just not genuinely cared about humans.

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Frozenfangirl wrote: He wanted to protect his daughter. He didn't say to kill anyone. He wanted to keep her away from them.

      When Ariel pointed out that Eric would have died at sea, he dismissively responded "One less human to worry about!" That would indicate he at the very least did not care if humans died as a result, maybe even wanted them to die or at least preferred it. Also, keep in mind that her saving Eric wouldn't have even threatened her at all (Eric was unconscious when she rescued him, and he only got a brief glimpse of Ariel, and from the lighting he would have reasonably assumed Ariel was human, not a mermaid), so Triton's statement was extremely callous when you think about it.

      Well, let's think of this another way. Triton thinks humans are dangerous and quite close to animals (by the sound of it). So, imagine a dangerous animal (don't know what you consider dangerous, so I will just leave it at that) that there are a lot of. One dies. And of course, the less there are, the more chances you will survive. Is this callous and warped? A little. Is it true? Most likely. Of course, we have the Ariels out there who take large lengths to protect them.

      Yes, except the problem is that 1. Eric was unconscious and thus not even a threat to Ariel at that moment, and 2. Even when he woke up and saw Ariel, he only got a brief glimpse of her, and the lighting and position Ariel was currently at would give (and had given) Eric the reasonable assumption that Ariel had been a human girl, rather than a mermaid, thus not actually making him a threat to Ariel in either case.

      Yes, but did the dad know this?(sorry, haven't seen the Little Mermaid in a while)

      He at least knew that Eric had been unconscious, considering he mentioned that Ariel saved him from drowning.

      Okay. But of course, I think that he might have just not genuinely cared about humans.

      Maybe not. Then again, I don't necessary care about some criminals, yet if they are near death and unconscious, it simply wouldn't be right to simply leave them to die, so I kinda find that attitude extremely callous and cold.

        Loading editor
    • You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

        Loading editor
    • Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

        Loading editor
    • Anna and Elsa really aren't any different than most of the princesses. There are two kinds of princesses. The bland and naïve (Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora) and the stong and independent (Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, and so on up to Merida). Anna is classified under the former and Elsa under the latter. I did a video discussing This whole topic and the Princess genre.

        Loading editor
    • ^ can I see that video?

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.

        Loading editor
    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.

      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.

        Loading editor
    • Movimationguy wrote:
      Anna and Elsa really aren't any different than most of the princesses. There are two kinds of princesses. The bland and naïve (Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora) and the stong and independent (Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, and so on up to Merida). Anna is classified under the former and Elsa under the latter. I did a video discussing This whole topic and the Princess genre.

      Are you sure Anna and Elsa are not diffrent from the other princess because months ago I asked on the comment section of Frozen if they were unique like Merida was and User:AvatarCorin34 replyed by saying. and I quote.


      I agree, and I would add Rapunzel in there too, but only to a degree.  The age of the CGI princess is really a landmark for Disney, not only have the proven they can animate as well as other companies but they are breaking the molds of what a Princess should be.  Having pretty much brought new definition and public opinion to the word they are now steering it into a new, more realistic direction.  Rapunzel was weird and quirky but still followed the traditional path of a Disney Princess,  Merida did not, she blew that out of the water and now with Frozen Anna and Elsa perpetuate the advancement.  Anna is so strange, and weird, and people love her.  She is like Rapunzel on a million pixi stixs.  And even though Anna ends up with Kristoff, that is not even a focal point, they make you think it is but by the end of the movie you realize they were toying with you.  Elsa is like Merida and she now has an internal conflict as well as external, something other Disney Princess never really had, at least not to her degree and if anything that conveys that a Princess can be deeply flawed.  Like I said, they are steering the Princess 'ship' into a whole new world. (See what I did there?)

      For a company as old as Disney and with the history that Disney had, they have taken great strides in the revival era.  Tiana was much like any Renaissance princess and Rapunzel was a baby step, Merida was a leap and Anna and Elsa are bounds. (Leaps and Bounds) So to answer your question no, Anna, Elsa and Merida are not 'ordinary princesses.'

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.

      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.

        Loading editor
    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.

      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.

      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.

      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.

        Loading editor
    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.

      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.

      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

        Loading editor
    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.

      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.

      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.
      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.
      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.

      If you guys want to think that then fine  I can't stop you go ahead and lie to yourselfs.

        Loading editor
    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.
      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.
      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.

      If you guys want to think that then fine  I can't stop you go ahead and lie to yourselfs.

      Well, you have yet to prove your point and we want to see your view. Go ahead. Hit us with your brand of genius.

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.
      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.
      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.

      If you guys want to think that then fine  I can't stop you go ahead and lie to yourselfs.

      Well, you have yet to prove your point and we want to see your view. Go ahead. Hit us with your brand of genius.

      Agreed, Emmarainbow432, and besides, Wolf91, If I'm reading you correctly, you seem to be under the belief that women are only truly liberated if they stay away from men, at least, that's what you're effectively implying especially when Merida, Anna, and Elsa basically liberated themselves from males by not marrying at all. I've had to experience the exact result of such an ideology, and let's put it this way, the woman who promoted feminism, militant feminism I should add, basically treated us males like crap, acting as if we are perverts who name any archaeological findings after their lusts, basically bashed Catholicism and Christianity as a whole despite her being a lapsed Catholic, possibly in recovery (and BTW, Catholicism is my religion as well), and making falsehoods about women's treatment, real falsehoods at that (like claiming that women weren't educated at all until the 1960s, despite the fact that at least two of the four jobs women were allowed to have besides homemaker during the 1950s, secretary and schoolteacher, did require education and especially literacy, plus there being plenty of examples of female writers beforehand, and that's not even getting into girls going to private and public schools or going to convents). She also had a daughter, a little girl, and right now I feel very sorry for her for putting up with a woman who most likely hates men despite mating with one to give birth to her. And it's not just women who are promoting this garbage, even men are under the same delusion that the free sex and second-wave feminist movements of the 1960s were good, and Christianity invented misogyny, despite the Ancient Greeks practicing it for far longer than Christianity even existed, all because of Saint Augustine's Original Sin doctrine.

      Oh, and BTW, since Merida was a Pixar creation instead of a Disney creation, she really shouldn't have been included into the lineup. It was a mistake, and if Pixar ever leaves, they're going to have to pay for that mistake by having to remove her.

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:


      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:



      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.
      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.
      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.
      If you guys want to think that then fine  I can't stop you go ahead and lie to yourselfs.
      Well, you have yet to prove your point and we want to see your view. Go ahead. Hit us with your brand of genius.

      Sorry maby my last comment was a bit rude.

        Loading editor
    • Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:


      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:



      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.
      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.
      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.
      If you guys want to think that then fine  I can't stop you go ahead and lie to yourselfs.
      Well, you have yet to prove your point and we want to see your view. Go ahead. Hit us with your brand of genius.
      Agreed, Emmarainbow432, and besides, Wolf91, If I'm reading you correctly, you seem to be under the belief that women are only truly liberated if they stay away from men, at least, that's what you're effectively implying especially when Merida, Anna, and Elsa basically liberated themselves from males by not marrying at all. I've had to experience the exact result of such an ideology, and let's put it this way, the woman who promoted feminism, militant feminism I should add, basically treated us males like crap, acting as if we are perverts who name any archaeological findings after their lusts, basically bashed Catholicism and Christianity as a whole despite her being a lapsed Catholic, possibly in recovery (and BTW, Catholicism is my religion as well), and making falsehoods about women's treatment, real falsehoods at that (like claiming that women weren't educated at all until the 1960s, despite the fact that at least two of the four jobs women were allowed to have besides homemaker during the 1950s, secretary and schoolteacher, did require education and especially literacy, plus there being plenty of examples of female writers beforehand, and that's not even getting into girls going to private and public schools or going to convents). She also had a daughter, a little girl, and right now I feel very sorry for her for putting up with a woman who most likely hates men despite mating with one to give birth to her. And it's not just women who are promoting this garbage, even men are under the same delusion that the free sex and second-wave feminist movements of the 1960s were good, and Christianity invented misogyny, despite the Ancient Greeks practicing it for far longer than Christianity even existed, all because of Saint Augustine's Original Sin doctrine.

      Oh, and BTW, since Merida was a Pixar creation instead of a Disney creation, she really shouldn't have been included into the lineup. It was a mistake, and if Pixar ever leaves, they're going to have to pay for that mistake by having to remove her.

      Who Who Who I'm not trying to imply any of that at all. To tell you the truth with the excaption of Frozen and Brave it's been a realy realy long time since I have seen a Disney Princess movie but I know that they are not realy that strong willed because When I was watching one of the behind the scens videos for Brave Merida's voice actress said that Merida was not an avrage Disney Princess at all and on the comment section of the Frozen page I asked if Anna and Else were uniqu like Merida and User:AvatarCorin34 replyed saying that Merida, Anna and Elsa were not ordinary Princess at all (who's comment I showed earlyr on this threed) and what he said actuly made sense so I belived him. Also I asked some people in my social circal about the Disney Princess franchiss and they told me that many of the movies had femal steryotyps also I once saw a news story about how parents did't want their kids to be like the disney princess because the princess just waited around for love, then I said that I typed in the comment section that I saw the story and User:Sings-With-Spirits agreed by macking a list of exampals wich I also showed the comment on this threed earlyr. I would't say I am a feminist but I do belive in gender equality.

        Loading editor
    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Weedle McHairybug wrote:


      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:



      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote: You know what I started hearing about how Mulan and Pocahontas are also uniqu but then I started hearing about Ariel being uniqu then they were all unique so I'm just going to go back to the only ones who are REALY unique among the Disney Princess Franchise are Merida, Anna and Elsa. The other movies had steryotypes in them anywhay.

      They are stereotyped too.

      ANNA : Adorkable one, naive, little sister

      MERIDA :Rebellious, doesn't care what others think, tomboy

      ELSA :Fierce, tough, hiding a secret, loyal

      ((Seem pretty stereotypical to me))

      They don't realy seem steryotyical to me.
      I have seen most of them somewhere else (by them, I mean personality). They are the naive one, the brooding one, and the tomboy. Sure, they are more modern stereotypes. But they are stereotypes nonetheless. Saying that they are the only ones who weren't stereotypes is a straight out lie.
      The why have people said that Anna and Elsa from Frozen Anna and Elsa and Merida from Brave are good examples for kids because last time I check steryotypical people are not realy good role models.
      Actually, that depends on the stereotype. There are some stereotypes that can be a good goal to strive for (think kind, generous, smart). Anna is sweet, which I get. But I have no idea who would make Elsa and Merida role models, because I would rather not be around people who a. Have a secret and then run away and belt a song about it (seriously, there is no where where anyone could do that with the same affect as Elsa) or b. Somebody who gladly and haphazardly risks people's life to prove a point.
      Well if you ask me Anna, Elsa and Merida are good role models they teach little girls that their is more to life then just waithing around for a guy to take care of you and looking for true love ect.
      Technically, Tiana only pursued a career, not true love (plus Mulan didn't exactly pursue true love herself, even in her sequel), and even Belle didn't exactly pursue true love, nor did Princess Jasmine.

      And for the record, as stated countless times before, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any "waiting" for a guy to take care of them (and given the circumstances, it's perfectly justified as they literally had no other options but to do just that thanks to a cursed spinning wheel and a poisoned apple, respectively). All the others (or at least Cinderella and Ariel) actually did pursue their future mates, and even Ariel's a bit debatable as while she did love Eric, she also at the same time already harbored a desire to actually become human. And besides, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you regarding whether those messages are remotely good for girls (the ones not involving prince charming, I mean).

      I agree with this, plus, when you really think about it, did the others actually teach girls to wait around for guys? No! It taught to be generous and nice. There was a prince. They got saved by and married the prince.
      If you guys want to think that then fine  I can't stop you go ahead and lie to yourselfs.
      Well, you have yet to prove your point and we want to see your view. Go ahead. Hit us with your brand of genius.
      Agreed, Emmarainbow432, and besides, Wolf91, If I'm reading you correctly, you seem to be under the belief that women are only truly liberated if they stay away from men, at least, that's what you're effectively implying especially when Merida, Anna, and Elsa basically liberated themselves from males by not marrying at all. I've had to experience the exact result of such an ideology, and let's put it this way, the woman who promoted feminism, militant feminism I should add, basically treated us males like crap, acting as if we are perverts who name any archaeological findings after their lusts, basically bashed Catholicism and Christianity as a whole despite her being a lapsed Catholic, possibly in recovery (and BTW, Catholicism is my religion as well), and making falsehoods about women's treatment, real falsehoods at that (like claiming that women weren't educated at all until the 1960s, despite the fact that at least two of the four jobs women were allowed to have besides homemaker during the 1950s, secretary and schoolteacher, did require education and especially literacy, plus there being plenty of examples of female writers beforehand, and that's not even getting into girls going to private and public schools or going to convents). She also had a daughter, a little girl, and right now I feel very sorry for her for putting up with a woman who most likely hates men despite mating with one to give birth to her. And it's not just women who are promoting this garbage, even men are under the same delusion that the free sex and second-wave feminist movements of the 1960s were good, and Christianity invented misogyny, despite the Ancient Greeks practicing it for far longer than Christianity even existed, all because of Saint Augustine's Original Sin doctrine.

      Oh, and BTW, since Merida was a Pixar creation instead of a Disney creation, she really shouldn't have been included into the lineup. It was a mistake, and if Pixar ever leaves, they're going to have to pay for that mistake by having to remove her.

      Who Who Who I'm not trying to imply any of that at all. To tell you the truth with the excaption of Frozen and Brave it's been a realy realy long time since I have seen a Disney Princess movie but I know that they are not realy that strong willed because When I was watching one of the behind the scens videos for Brave Merida's voice actress said that Merida was not an avrage Disney Princess at all and on the comment section of the Frozen page I asked if Anna and Else were uniqu like Merida and User:AvatarCorin34 replyed saying that Merida, Anna and Elsa were not ordinary Princess at all (who's comment I showed earlyr on this threed) and what he said actuly made sense so I belived him. Also I asked some people in my social circal about the Disney Princess franchiss and they told me that many of the movies had femal steryotyps also I once saw a news story about how parents did't want their kids to be like the disney princess because the princess just waited around for love, then I said that I typed in the comment section that I saw the story and User:Sings-With-Spirits agreed by macking a list of exampals wich I also showed the comment on this threed earlyr. I would't say I am a feminist but I do belive in gender equality.

      Those parents apparently either haven't actually watched the films, or otherwise just ignored the evidence to push an agenda. Of the Disney Princesses we've seen so far, only Aurora and Snow White actually did any kind of waiting for love (and even then, it is perfectly justified due to them being put into a coma that required love's first kiss to wake them up). Most of the other princesses, yes, even Cinderella, were proactive and actually pursued their love rather than merely waited around, and many of them don't even pursue love. I know Belle, Jasmine, Pocahontas, Mulan, Tiana, and Rapunzel never had love even cross their minds until... what, midway through their films, if at all in the case of Mulan? If anything, since Beauty and the Beast up to possibly Princess and the Frog (being the first DP film since The Little Mermaid to actually show the princess wedding her love in her debut film, and even that's a stretch since Tiana for most of the film cared more about starting a business than, you know, starting a family), Disney Princess films have for the most part demonized marriage, with many of them rejecting suitors (certainly Belle, Jasmine, and Pocahontas did, and while Mulan didn't necessarily reject any suitors, she did bomb her matchmaking ceremony in a spectacular manner), and aren't actually shown actually marrying their true loves until the sequel (or in the case of Rapunzel, a short), and that's assuming we either see the marriages in any of the animated mediums (Belle's wedding was never shown in any of the animated installations of Beauty and the Beast, and in fact, the best we've got are coloring books and novels, only one of which, Weddings, was possibly not of the DP franchise), or if they even marry at all (as was the case of Merida and Frozen), and there's more of a chance for Frozen having a wedding in its sequel than Merida's sequel ever will specifically because Merida was specifically created as a feminist fantasy.

      And either way, Phyllis Schlafly would disagree with you and those parents, and most certainly disagreed with their demonization of Cinderella (heck, she even wrote an entire section on it. I'll post it as soon as I find the book).

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    • Since, I don't want to quote the entire conversation due to length, I would like to add the fact that I agree with Weedle McHairybug completely, and of course have some more things to say:

      Okay, when was this interview done? It sounds like a promotional deal. Mainly because that sounds like, I don't know, a promotional motto. And think about this: Merida was actually one of the only princesses that actually thought about love most of the way through. Sure, she saw romance as garbage, but she did care about it (or else she wouldn't have been talking about it all the time). Anna actually thought about it and got a man in the end (so, does that make her not a strong awesome character). And of course, Elsa will be unliberated (if that's your point of mind) because she will get a love interest in the sequel.

        Loading editor
    • Most likely because a lot of those so-called "parents" simply are radical man-hating feminists who think their daughters should not be allowed to interact with males. I remember having a professor back in Spring 2011 who constantly pushed that women suffered a lot, even not getting an education until the 1960s, and basically treating us guys like dirt. Phyllis Schlafly also inferred much of the same thing regarding the feminists claims about Cinderella and The Cinderella Complex. Here's the passage:

      "The Cinderella Complex

      "The passing of Princess Grace was the occasion of hundreds of news stories and features, as well as the picture on the cover of Time magazine. Many of the stories (intentionally or unintentionally) conveyed the subliminal message that her life was "the last fairy tale," that her love story was unique and could never happen again.

      "The reason for those cynical undertones was that Princess Grace was the modern personification of the Cinderella fairy tale, which for years has been a despised target of the women's liberation movement. Princess Grace's very existence proved that an American Cinderella can marry her Prince Charming, move to his palace on the hill, and live happily ever after.

      "When the women's liberation movement held sway in the 1970s, one of the quirks of its ideology was a passionate debunking of the Cinderella fairy tale. That harmless children's story became a bête noire of the women's liberation movement; it was labeled a stereotype of women's oppression which must be censored out of children's books.

      "Feminist ideologues inveighed against the "myth" and "delusion" of Cinderella because it encouraged little girls to believe that a Prince Charming could come along and that they would live happily ever after. Cinderella was decried as the ultimate in 'sexist' childrearing.

      "The publication of the 1981 book The Cinderella Complex by Colette Dowling sent shock waves through the women's liberation movement. Written by a feminist, the author argued regretfully that most women do have a secret desire to depend on a husband who will support and defend his wife.

      "One day while I was in a television studio, a young woman producer accosted me with the question, "Mrs. Schlafly, do you believe in the thesis of the book Cinderella Complex?" I said, "Yes, I think most women would like to marry a man who will support and defend her." She replied, "I'm afraid you're right. But I'm trying to overcome that feeling."

      "Since the young woman was in her twenties and nice looking, I told her she didn't really need to try to overcome her Cinderella complex--her Prince Charming just might come along someday. Her heart told her I was right, but her liberated mind refused to accept it.

      "One thing's is sure. If you make up your mind that you will never find your Prince Charming, you won't. If you decide in advance that it is impossible to live happily ever after, you won't. But it all can happen to you if you make up your mind that it can happen. I know--because it happened to me."

      Page 198-199 of Feminist Fantasies by Phyllis Schlafly. This is an excerpt but communicates the message fairly well.

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    • Wolf 91, the only bad thing these say about Mulan is that she has to live a double standard (which is just the way her society is and yet she defied this) and that men should be powerfuland tough, though it is revealed that the gang of three, who are now noble warriors, are softened up at the end of the film (Yao even cries) and that is okay. Fa Zhou let's his sensitive side show, and Shang learns that's it's fine to be yourself, even if it's dorky and not so tough at all times.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Movimationguy wrote:
      Anna and Elsa really aren't any different than most of the princesses. There are two kinds of princesses. The bland and naïve (Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora) and the stong and independent (Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, and so on up to Merida). Anna is classified under the former and Elsa under the latter. I did a video discussing This whole topic and the Princess genre.
      Are you sure Anna and Elsa are not diffrent from the other princess because months ago I asked on the comment section of Frozen if they were unique like Merida was and User:AvatarCorin34 replyed by saying. and I quote.


      I agree, and I would add Rapunzel in there too, but only to a degree.  The age of the CGI princess is really a landmark for Disney, not only have the proven they can animate as well as other companies but they are breaking the molds of what a Princess should be.  Having pretty much brought new definition and public opinion to the word they are now steering it into a new, more realistic direction.  Rapunzel was weird and quirky but still followed the traditional path of a Disney Princess,  Merida did not, she blew that out of the water and now with Frozen Anna and Elsa perpetuate the advancement.  Anna is so strange, and weird, and people love her.  She is like Rapunzel on a million pixi stixs.  And even though Anna ends up with Kristoff, that is not even a focal point, they make you think it is but by the end of the movie you realize they were toying with you.  Elsa is like Merida and she now has an internal conflict as well as external, something other Disney Princess never really had, at least not to her degree and if anything that conveys that a Princess can be deeply flawed.  Like I said, they are steering the Princess 'ship' into a whole new world. (See what I did there?)

      For a company as old as Disney and with the history that Disney had, they have taken great strides in the revival era.  Tiana was much like any Renaissance princess and Rapunzel was a baby step, Merida was a leap and Anna and Elsa are bounds. (Leaps and Bounds) So to answer your question no, Anna, Elsa and Merida are not 'ordinary princesses.'

      Yeah Anna is bland and naïve because she doesn't go on a journey to save her sister, saves her love interest (the wolves) and is willing to sacrifice herself for those she loves, oh wait SHE DOES how did you miss it?

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    • We know what Anna looks like when she sleeps compared to Cinderella and Snow White. So if guys imagine marrying any of the princesses and sleeping with them every night, they won't have to be embarrassed by their messy hair and loud snoring if they choose Anna.

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    • All of them are special and unique in their own ways. I can relate to Belle more than any of them compared to merida, anna, or Elsa.

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    • Can we just settle this argument by saying that it's you're own opinion whether they're unique or not and there's no "True" answer to the question. It's just like opinions on foods. Everyone has different taste buds with the food situaton and everyone has different ideas of "uniqueness" with the unique situation. Can we just end it that way and settle our argument. After all,  everyone does have their own opinion. This is a silly argument anyway. (Yes I know I joined it, so please don't call me a hypocryte Because I understand your guys' reasons for joining/starting it.)

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    • Frozenfan15 wrote:
      If you think they're different I think you also should include Tiana, she was career focusedhwo many disney ladies can say that?

      Yes

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    • Look, all of them have different traits. One thing I absolutely hate about the feminist movement is that it discourages sugar-plum fairy princess dreams. I have played with dolls, dressed up as a pretty-pretty-princess, and I'm doing well in school, I don't take crap from guys or girls.

       Okay,what I'm trying to say is, we're all different and unique. Each Disney Princess effects certain people certain ways. Pax?
      
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    • Can someone just close this discussion?

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    • Lilymoth wrote:
      Look, all of them have different traits. One thing I absolutely hate about the feminist movement is that it discourages sugar-plum fairy princess dreams. I have played with dolls, dressed up as a pretty-pretty-princess, and I'm doing well in school, I don't take crap from guys or girls. Okay,what I'm trying to say is, we're all different and unique. Each Disney Princess effects certain people certain ways. Pax?

      Hey, You're just like me! Hi five!

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    • Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)

        Loading editor
    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)

      You do?

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)

      You do?

      Last time you didn't want us to close it so...

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)
      You do?
      Last time you didn't want us to close it so...

      I did't even know you guys needed my permission to close this thread.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)
      You do?
      Last time you didn't want us to close it so...

      I did't even know you guys needed my permission to close this thread.

      It's just a comedy of errors, feel free to close it if you want.

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)
      You do?
      Last time you didn't want us to close it so...
      I did't even know you guys needed my permission to close this thread.
      It's just a comedy of errors, feel free to close it if you want.

      What do you mean when you say comedy of errors.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)
      You do?
      Last time you didn't want us to close it so...
      I did't even know you guys needed my permission to close this thread.
      It's just a comedy of errors, feel free to close it if you want.

      What do you mean when you say comedy of errors.

      It's a figure of speech in the way that mistakes were made (mostly by me) and looking back, it was a little funny. Nothing serious.

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    • Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:

      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Wolf 91 wrote:


      Emmarainbow432 wrote:

      Lovefiction wrote: Can someone just close this discussion?

      I wanted to a while ago, but I think we need Wolf91's remission or something (?)
      You do?
      Last time you didn't want us to close it so...
      I did't even know you guys needed my permission to close this thread.
      It's just a comedy of errors, feel free to close it if you want.
      What do you mean when you say comedy of errors.
      It's a figure of speech in the way that mistakes were made (mostly by me) and looking back, it was a little funny. Nothing serious.

      Oh ok.

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    • Betep Stone wrote:
      And how would one suggest that Mulan is like the others? That statement makes no sense.

      Was Mulan unique in the sequle to her movie.

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    • Betep Stone wrote:
      And how would one suggest that Mulan is like the others? That statement makes no sense.

      Was Mulan unique in the sequle to her movie.

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    • Wolf 91, you would need to explain to me why Mulan is not unique anymore in the sequal because as far as I'm concerned, she is her same self with a little more life's experience and in a different kind of situation.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Betep Stone wrote:
      And how would one suggest that Mulan is like the others? That statement makes no sense.
      Was Mulan unique in the sequle to her movie.

      Sequels are non-canon so it doesn't count.

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    • Betep Stone wrote:
      Wolf 91, you would need to explain to me why Mulan is not unique anymore in the sequal because as far as I'm concerned, she is her same self with a little more life's experience and in a different kind of situation.

      I never saw the sequal so I was just asking.

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    • Oh. Sorry about that, Wolf 91. Yes, I still think she's unique because she is still a strong feminist character, but stays true to her country and is very selfless. She still practices martial arts too, and does a lot of other outdoor activities- seeming to enjoy it and be altogether happier than in the first film. But not unrealistically happy. She fights and almost breaks up with Shang, which I think is a large difference for Disney.

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Disney4Disney wrote:
      Every Disney Princess is unique.
      No they arent.

      Snow White - A young, co dependant, but generally nice and a motherly figure.

      Cinderella - A servant putting her work before her freedom.

      Aurora - A bland-as-rice-cakes princess who sleeps through most of the film

      Ariel - A curious and optimistic girl

      Belle - A mature and sophisticated women, not afraid to be different.

      Jasmine - A pampered princess

      Pocahontas - A free-spirited adventurous girl willing to sacrifice herself for the greater good

      Mulan - A free-thinker not afraid to step out of her expectations of a woman

      Tiana - A hard working, mature and responsible woman.

      Rapunzel - Basically Belle, Ariel and Cinderella mashed into one.

      So, all the princesses are unique.

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    • Wolf 91
      Wolf 91 removed this reply because:
      I made it multiple times by accident.
      03:49, September 24, 2014
      This reply has been removed
    • Wolf 91
      Wolf 91 removed this reply because:
      I made it multiple times by accident.
      03:50, September 24, 2014
      This reply has been removed
    • Betep Stone wrote:
      Oh. Sorry about that, Wolf 91. Yes, I still think she's unique because she is still a strong feminist character, but stays true to her country and is very selfless. She still practices martial arts too, and does a lot of other outdoor activities- seeming to enjoy it and be altogether happier than in the first film. But not unrealistically happy. She fights and almost breaks up with Shang, which I think is a large difference for Disney.

      Wait then whay dous it say hear that Mulan II deals with arranged marriagesloyaltyrelationshipsmaking choicestrust, and finding true love.

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    • Wolf 91
      Wolf 91 removed this reply because:
      I made it multiple times by accident.
      03:49, September 24, 2014
      This reply has been removed
    • This thread goes on for quite a while so I didn't read every post and I'm just going to quickly drop my two cents on my thoughts about the DPs as a whole.

      tbh, I don't think they're quite as bad as people let on. Yeah, they're not always the deepest characters and are sometimes questionable role models, but for the most part, the main issue is that a lot of them default to "happily ever after means finding (a man) true love. Which happens in a variety of ways.    

      It's been a while since I saw Snow White but I recall that she was waiting around for her prince charming to come for her.

      Aurora had an arranged marriage and at first didn't even want anything to do with Prince Phillip, though I think she was waiting for love to come her way too.

      Cinderella was a hard working young woman who was trying to make best of a crudy situation and wasn't even looking for romance. She just stumbled across it.

      Ariel was seeking adventure and the unknown and part of the way through fell in love with Price Erick so she tried to obtain both. 

      Jamine was looking for freedom and didn't want any of her pompous suiters so she ran away and found love on her own terms.

      Tiana is a lot like Cinderella in that she's a hard working young women trying to make the best of a crudy situation. It's just where Cinderella tried to branch out and have some fun, Tiana was more dedicated to her work and also found love along the way. She saw it as a waste of time at first. 

      Belle also wanted adventure and to break away from her stagnent life and found love along the way. 

      Mulan was an eccentric young lady who went along with the attempted arranged marriage but didn't fit in with her own societies customs so went her own way. Again, finding love along the way. 

      Rapunzel was locked away all her life and all she wanted to do was achieve her dream. Later, Eugine became her "new dream".

      Pocahontas also had marrige arraingment troubles and wanted freedom and also eventually found love along the way.

      Merida wanted freedom, had marriage arraingment issues, and is the only one who doesn't find love along the way, but seems to be interested in the future. 

      They all are unique in their own way but also all have "signature" traits, mainly being marraige/romance/arrainged marraige in some way. In fact, most of them aren't even looking for romance, it sort of just finds them. The only ones that I'd say aren't all that unique are Aurora and Snow White, but for the most part, I think the rest are fine. 

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    • Saying Anna, Elsa and Merida are the only unique princesses ever is EXACTLY like saying there are only 3 unique people in the world. No 2 people are the same. Each is different in his or her own way.

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    • Myruthb wrote: In my opinion, Mulan and Pocahontas are the most different of all. Pocahontas DID NOT want love. She wanted to find her path. Her story was rich, detailed and very great, because it was different. Mulan wanted to save her father, and uphold the family honor. Again, a very interesting and unique storyline. BTW @Disney4Disney, you forgot Pocahontas! ;)

      Preach. Mulan is my queen.

      I understand that quite a few of the founding princess are remarkably similar superficially. But they all are meant to represent concepts, and each one represents something distinctly different from the other. They're all special and they're all different. They're all gorgeous skinny light skinned girls, yes, but again, that's superficial stuff.

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    • Disney4Disney wrote:
      Saying Anna, Elsa and Merida are the only unique princesses ever is EXACTLY like saying there are only 3 unique people in the world. No 2 people are the same. Each is different in his or her own way.

      That's true. 

      Everyone is different.

      Elsa- can control ice POWERS.

      Anna- Is similar to Rapunzel and Ariel together.

      Merida-  Is free-sprited and adventurous. 

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    • Orlando678 wrote:
      Belle was actually eaten in the original story... And I'm sorry for the typo. Don't forget the actual moral, if you believe in your dreams , chase them and you can only hope that it comes true.

      Which version though?

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    • AniBuff1923
      AniBuff1923 removed this reply because:
      This was a real life controversial opinion.
      04:30, February 7, 2020
      This reply has been removed
    • Joseph8 wrote:
      Anna and Elsa are definitely feminist icons.

      No, I think that's supposed to be Merida. 

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    • Lovefiction wrote:

      Joseph8 wrote:
      Anna and Elsa are definitely feminist icons.

      No, I think that's supposed to be Merida. 

      Don't forget Belle. She was certainly intended to be one based on comments from the production staff of Beauty and the Beast, ESPECIALLY Linda Woolverton and Jeffrey Katzenberg.

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    • Joseph8 wrote:
      Anna and Elsa are definitely feminist icons.

      Technically all the Disney females are.

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    • Wolf 91, if think all females and Disney Princesses are unique, not only Anna, Elsa and Merdia. I know that their films are CGI, but that dosen't matter, right?

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    • I also think every disney movie is different. I like the more active disney princess.  My favorties are Anna , Ariel , Mulan and Belle. 

      Anna becuase she is funny , clumsy , selfless and brave. She is also very aventures and a bit of a tomboy.  I love her sining. At the end she is one who saves her big sister. And we share the same name ;) 

      Ariel because she is the frist active disney princess. While others like Snow white where wating for their prince to come Ariel rescue his life. So she is the frist princess to save the prince. Ariel has also for a long time wanted to become a human. (So she dosent change herself for a man.)

      Mulan is my favorite becuase she is brave enough to go on her own in the army without knowing what she got herself into. At the end she saves China. She will always be my hero. 

      Belle is also one of my favorites because I can relate to her so much. I am a reader and a dreamer and I feel like people dont understand me. But when I read or write I feel like I can be myself. Just like Belle. Belle is also very brave and nice. 

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    • Wolf 91 wrote:
      Disney4Disney wrote:
      Every Disney Princess is unique.
      No they arent.

      Yes. They. ARE! Snow White, Cinderella, and Aurora, though, are pretty much the same. But every other princess is unique and diffrent. Think about it. Most of them have something the others don't. Which makes Them...... THEM! Anna wouldn't be anna if she wasn't socialble and fun loving, belle wouldn't be belle if she didn't like books, and so on. I have said everything I needed to say. Peace out.* leaves*

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    • Ok, now. Every princess has especial things but there's the things that make us choose who are the ones who really teach us: their mistakes, their immaturity and no so well decisions. Life is not so perfect, even for Disney princesses. For example, Jasmine was immature for run away and not care about her daddy, then she doesn't tell in an assertive way her feelings -well, then, she just comes shut up when she wants to be sultan, she doesn't want to make a vincule between she and her dad-. she are just in "be princess, don't say more, accept the life even if you don't like it" like don't tell anything when presents the suitor (in the new movie of Aladin) and don't tell good that feelings. Ok, the actress of the movie of the Aladin is beautiful ha, ha but it's the context of their life that maters. I like her but is my dream who makes me don't like her... it has to be with Sonic. Is that little things who makes me love one more than the another. Jasmine has many things to makes her especial, like be independent, girls and everyone needs to learn that and I'm really learning thanks to that but not be just like Jasmine because she have wrong things (that's the secret to get mature and learn in this life, accept one person to how it is, take the things it makes you good and erase the things that not because you need to be your self). I think is the opposite with Merida, Jasmine can learn so many things with her. Merida can be more "agressive" (she has a strong personality like Elastigirl or Ellie) but she is more assertive, she run away with reasons and make have sure of that (she wants to be free and be one with nature, change her destiny). She is not mad with her suitors (what a funny suitors) but she obviously doesn't want they control her, her dream is more in a personal way, she doesn't put her self in the context to "hate men because they will not make come true my dream" and put herself in fights and "doesn't want romance...LOVE because that means to get merried". After all, she believes in love, she became wise when she is in the place who makes her a correct human being of God (nature) and she start to make vincule with her mother after a wrong desicion (she knew to change her destiny changing her self first and love her mother). I love the movie because there is not an anatagonist, it's innovator and explain the True Love, to learn with nature. I think princesses can learn to the another princesses and people around their (not just men but care people and wise people like their parents or friends) because everyone is especial and imperfect and princess can be better people.

      Now, I see that. People say, they don't look for romance... Oh, God. In life I learn so many things, things that make us humans, and make us have that power to be a productive human being and one is LOVE. Without love our lifes will not have sense, with love we are happy and we really change our selves and the lifes of everyone. Is an immature and some sign you need to learn more things think one doesn't needs love, because that doesn't true. Imagine that, if you are the only human being in the Earth, for what make a picture if no one gonna watch it? Or for what invent something if no one gonna use it? For what walk if always will be the same? We need the anothers to have the sense to live and dream, everyone has a little world, a Universe who was made from the share of the another worlds of everyone. We need love, we need someone who complemente us, who make us comes out from our close thoughts, to have a point of view different about something who likes you. If world only will control by men it will be a chaos and if women only control world will be a complete chaos. Everyone make us US. Some princesses was some immature before met their love... even Pocahontas, she was really wise but she get in another stage when he meets her love and that will mean a complete new adventure were she needs to get out to her confort zone. Every princess finish different then to met their love... or any other example we want put. They became more mature when life gives her a new point of view. Rapunzel discovered a new world and her life change when she met her love. But there's the imperfect things with their Loves because they as humans have some mistakes who makes some things doesn't go pretty fine... everyone are still immature but they need to learn. For example Alladin an Jasmine layed echoder, Alladin doesn't know and have no idea about the important who Jasmine needs to have in her personal life that is not just be confident and independent if not thank the life she has, tell her thoughts, how she feel, make a better vincule with her daddy (even if he is doesn't the most attentive sultan of all) and know the mistakes to just run away (because that's doesn't a good thing; she doesn't have a good comunication with her dad). Instead of that he still grow more the problem of her inter unconfident and don't be assertive. He is a theaf and she got mad with him when she discovered he was the theaf and know Alladin felt terrible. Know, it may be a really good Disney movies but there are some ones who has a really simple history, they doesn't go so far beyond. So we don't need to do a fight for that, this is something personal ;)

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    • Aw, come on. Princesses and cartoon characters? Lame!

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    • A FANDOM user
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